Credits by Exam

Some of these tests are offered nationally (DSST and CLEP exams) and some are unique to Strayer courses (Strayer Challenge exams). All are available at our campus libraries. Use the Campus Finder to contact your local campus for more details.

Strayer University accepts College-Level Examination Program (CLEP) tests as transfer credits for Undergraduate courses based on the guidelines set forth by the American Council on Education (ACE). To learn more, click here

Discipline

Accounting & Finance

ACC 100 Accounting I
ACC 206 Accounting II

Provides an understanding of accounting concepts, assumptions, and principles. Progresses to evaluation of accounting data for plant assets, current liabilities, deferrals and accruals, intangibles, payables, and payroll. Introduces accounting for corporations as related to stocks, bonds, and corporate earnings. Introduces partnership accounting and, in addition, introduces the statement of cash flows.

  1. Apply accounting concepts related to plant assets and re-associated expense items.
  2. Discuss current liabilities, long-term liabilities, and their amortization.
  3. Prepare transactions related to partnerships and corporations’ stockholder equity, and issue the related financial statements.
  4. Analyze the accounting concepts and journal entries required for long-term liabilities.
  5. Determine the concepts for investments and the related accounting transactions.
  6. Prepare a statement of cash flows and report on investments in international operations.
  7. Compute ratios used in analyzing a firm’s liquidity, profitability, and solvency.
  8. Review the use of ratio analysis for evaluating business performance.
  9. Use technology and information resources to research issues in financial accounting.
  10. Write clearly and concisely about financial accounting using proper writing mechanics.
Course Guide
ACC 303 Intermediate Accounting I

This course provides an in-depth study of accounting theory and a review of the accounting cycle. It concentrates on the conceptual framework underlying financial accounting, the preparation of financial statements, the time value of money, and the valuation of cash, temporary investments and receivables. The course refers to pronouncements of the Financial Accounting Standards (FASB) and the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants (AICPA).

  1. Describe and analyze the reasons for the basic procedures of the financial accounting cycle including the use of the journal and ledger, creation of a trial balance, and preparation of adjusting and closing entries.
  2. Describe and evaluate the importance of the professional environment of financial accounting, the functions of related organizations such as the SEC, the AICPA, the FASB and its predecessors, and the creation of Financial Accounting Standards, the conceptual framework, and other sources of GAAP.
  3. Analyze the functions and the main sections of the four primary financial accounting statements: the income statement, the statement of retained earnings, the balance sheet, and the statement of cash flows.
  4. Prepare the main sections of the four primary financial accounting statements: the income statement, the statement of retained earnings, the balance sheet, and the statement of cash flows.
  5. Describe and evaluate the importance of the functions of International financial standard-setting organizations such as the IASB, IFRIC, IASCF and the IFRIC, the hierarchy of IFRS, and international accounting convergence.
  6. Analyze and explain the reasons for using the basic time value concepts and present value measurement.
  7. Calculate basic time value concepts and present value measurement.
  8. State the financial accounting practices and prepare typical journal entries related to cash, accounts receivable, and notes receivable.
  9. Use technology and information resources to research issues in intermediate accounting.
  10. Write clearly and concisely about intermediate accounting using proper writing mechanics.
Course Guide
ACC 304 Intermediate Accounting II

Topics covered include the accounting for inventories; property, plant, and equipment; intangible assets; current liabilities, non-current liabilities, and contingencies; and stockholders’ equity. The material refers to pronouncements of the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) and the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants (AICPA).

  1. Demonstrate, analyze, and explain the proper accounting for valuation of inventories using a cost-basis approach.
  2. Demonstrate, analyze, and explain the proper accounting for inventories involving additional valuation issues.
  3. Demonstrate, analyze, and explain the proper accounting for acquisition and valuation of property, plant, and equipment; valuation; costs subsequent to acquisition; and disposition of plant assets.
  4. Demonstrate, analyze, and explain the proper accounting for depreciation, impairments, and depletion.
  5. Demonstrate, analyze, and explain the proper accounting for intangible assets.
  6. Demonstrate, analyze, and explain the proper accounting for current liabilities and contingencies.
  7. Demonstrate, analyze, and explain the proper accounting for long-term liabilities.
  8. Prepare, analyze, and explain the proper accounting for stockholders’ equity.
  9. Prepare, analyze, and explain the proper accounting for dilutive securities and earnings per share.
  10. Articulate the standards and differences of GAAP and IFRS.
  11. Use technology and information resources to research issues in intermediate accounting.
  12. Write clearly and concisely about intermediate accounting using proper writing mechanics.
Course Guide
ACC 305 Intermediate Accounting III

Topics covered include the accounting for investments, revenue recognition, income taxes, pensions and postretirement benefits, and leases; accounting changes and error analysis; preparation of the statement of cash flows; and full disclosure in financial reporting. The material refers to pronouncements of the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) and the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants (AICPA).

  1. Demonstrate the proper accounting for investments, revenue recognition, income taxes, pensions and postretirement benefits, leases, and accounting changes and error analysis, including the required journal entries and supporting calculations.
  2. Apply IFRS concepts and applications.
  3. Analyze the reasons for and evaluate the importance of proper accounting for selected areas, such as: investments, revenue recognition, income taxes, pensions and postretirement benefits, leases, and accounting changes and error analysis, including the required journal entries and supporting calculations.
  4. Prepare a statement of cash flows under the indirect method; analyze and explain the reasons for using the indirect method.
  5. Analyze and explain the requirements for full disclosure in financial reporting.
  6. Evaluate the importance and impact of full disclosure or non-disclosure in accounting practices.
  7. Use technology and information resources to research issues in intermediate accounting.
  8. Write clearly and concisely about intermediate accounting using proper writing mechanics.
Course Guide
ACC 306 Microcomputer Applications for Accountants

This course covers the use of Peachtree Complete Accounting for Windows, Microsoft Excel, and the interface between the two software packages, as well as the functions and applications available under Peachtree and Excel.

  1. Create and update spreadsheets with Microsoft Excel.
  2. Discuss how automated accounting software can help management make better informed business decisions.
  3. Use advanced features of Microsoft Excel to solve business problems.
  4. Organize information between Word and Excel to communicate to internal and external users.
  5. Create and maintain accounting records with Peachtree.
  6. Generate financial reports for most small- to medium-sized businesses with Peachtree.
  7. Organize information between Peachtree and Excel to communicate to internal and external users.
  8. Convert a manual-based accounting system to Peachtree.
  9. Complete quarter-end / end-of-year accounting activities in Peachtree.
  10. Use technology and information resources to research issues in microcomputer applications for accountants.
  11. Write clearly and concisely about microcomputer applications for accountants using proper writing mechanics. 
Course Guide
ACC 307 Federal Taxation

Provides a comprehensive study of the types of taxes imposed by federal, state, and local authorities. Concepts covered include income realization, property and depreciation, tax deductions and credits, and rules related to capital gains and losses.

  1. Examine the types of taxes imposed at the federal, state, and local levels, the federal tax formula, and the rules for arriving at personal and dependency exemptions.
  2. Analyze the concepts of gross income and distinguish between the economic, accounting, and tax concepts of gross income and strategies to minimize gross income, maximize deductions, and minimize disallowance of deductions.
  3. Compute tax liability including various tax credits payments and how to calculate the income tax liability based upon the federal tax formula
  4. Analyze the concepts related to property, including depreciation, cost recovery, and amortization and depletion.
  5. Examine tax deductions from income related to employee expenses and self-employed related expenses.
  6. Analyze deductions from income, including medical expense, state and local taxes, interest, charitable deductions, personal and business expenses, and limitations on deductions.
  7. Examine the tax rules related to investor losses and tax credits.
  8. Analyze property transactions to determine gains or losses, capital assets, and the tax treatment for gains and losses.
  9. Analyze property considered under the capital gain rules, capital gains and losses, Section 1231, and recapture provision.
  10. Use technology and information resources to research issues in federal taxation.
  11. Write clearly and concisely about federal taxation using proper writing mechanics.
Course Guide
ACC 317 Advanced Federal Taxation

Covers the federal taxation of corporations, partnerships, and S corporations. Examines the administrative power of the IRS and tax concepts related to gifts, trusts, and estates.

  1. Examine the tax rules that are unique to corporations and the basic concerns relevant to shareholders and the corporation.
  2. Analyze the concepts of earnings and profits distribution, tax treatment for dividends to individual shareholders, tax impact of stock sales and redemption, liquidations, and reorganizations.
  3. Examine the tax rules and treatment related to partnerships.
  4. Analyze the concepts and tax treatment related to S corporations.
  5. Examine the concepts and tax treatment of exempt organizations.
  6. Analyze the U.S. tax provisions affecting U.S. persons earning foreign-source income, and for nonresident alien individuals and foreign corporations.
  7. Examine the administrative powers of the IRS, the audit process, taxpayer appeal, and professional ethics.
  8. Analyze the concepts and federal tax laws related to gifts and estates.
  9. Analyze the concepts and federal tax regulations for trusts and estates.
  10. Use technology and information resources to research issues in corporate federal taxation.
  11. Write clearly and concisely about corporate federal taxation using proper writing mechanics.
Course Guide
ACC 350 Cost Accounting

This course covers accounting procedures relating to the job-costing system, cost-volume-profit analysis, activity-based costing, the master budget, flexible budgets, responsibility accounting, variance analysis, inventory costing, and capacity analysis.

  1. Analyze the accountant’s role in the organization.
  2. Explain the various terms used in cost accounting and how they interrelate.
  3. Examine the assumptions of cost-volume-profit analysis.
  4. Discuss the allocation of costs to divisions, plants, departments, contracts, and products.
  5. Analyze activity-based costing and activity-based management.
  6. Analyze the advantage of budgeting, the preparation of a master budget, and other forms of planning.
  7. Compare and contrast the various management uses of variances.
  8. Describe costing methods for inventory control, denominator-level capacity concepts, and cost capacity analysis.
  9. Use technology and information resources to research issues in cost accounting.
  10. Write clearly and concisely about cost accounting using proper writing mechanics.
Course Guide
ACC 401 Advanced Accounting

Covers accounting for home office and branches, business combinations, and consolidations. Provides continuation of the preparation for the CPA examination as well as various techniques for solving some of the more complex problems in the business environment.

  1. Examine the business combination planning and accounting process.
  2. Analyze the accounting requirements for business combination and prepare the financial statements for the consolidation of subsidiaries on the date of acquisition.
  3. Analyze the accounting requirements for business combination and prepare the financial statements for the consolidation of subsidiaries after the acquisition.
  4. Explain and prepare the accounting for inter-company transactions.
  5. Analyze the effect of allocation and depreciation of difference between implied and book values.
  6. Analyze special issues related to business consolidations including changes in ownership, insolvency, liquidation, and reorganization.
  7. Examine the similarities and differences between US GAAP and IFRS, and the related requirements for accounting in the international marketplace.
  8. Analyze the accounting requirements for the translation of financial statements of foreign affiliates.
  9. Examine the requirements for reporting related to segments and for interim financial periods.
  10. Examine the elements of partnerships and the related accounting required for partnerships.
  11. Use technology and information resources to research issues in advanced accounting.
  12. Write clearly and concisely about advanced accounting using proper writing mechanics.
Course Guide
ACC 403 Auditing

Covers theory of auditing, including the educational and moral qualifications for auditors, as well as the role of the auditor in the American economy. Emphasizes professional standards, professional ethics, and the legal liability of auditors. Comprehensively covers planning and designing the audit program, gathering and summarizing evidence, and evaluating internal control.

  1. Analyze the required generally accepted auditing standards, professional ethics, and legal liability of the auditor.
  2. Assess how the Sarbanes-Oxley Act has affected auditing.
  3. Evaluate an audit report.
  4. Analyze the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants (AICPA) Code of Professional Ethics and apply it to specific auditing situations.
  5. Plan and design a generalized audit program.
  6. Determine the nature and extent of evidence accumulated to conduct an audit after considering the unique circumstances of an engagement.
  7. Evaluate a company’s various risk factors and the related impact to the audit process.
  8. Evaluate objectives for conducting audits and compare management and auditors responsibilities.
  9. Evaluate effective internal controls that minimize audit risk and potentially reduce the risk of fraud.
  10. Assess the impact of information technology and the audit process and the resulting impact to the overall audit plan and program.
  11. Apply auditing procedures to various business cycles and transactions.
  12. Use technology and information resources to research issues in auditing.
  13. Write clearly and concisely about auditing using proper writing mechanics.
Course Guide
ACC 410 Government and Not-for-Profit Accounting

This course analyzes accounting principles and procedures unique to federal, state, and local governments, and not-for-profit organizations. It illustrates financial statements and reports prepared for each type of entity, fund, and account group. The course explores the role of the Governmental Accounting Standards Board (GASB) and the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) in establishing accounting standards and disclosure requirements for governments and not-for-profit organizations.

  1. Assess government and not-for-profit financial reporting and how it differs from for-profit businesses.
  2. Assess the purpose of fund accounting, the types of funds used by governments and not-for-profits, and the basic government and fund statements.
  3. Evaluate the financial reporting of government not for profit organizations and assess the reporting requirements in accordance with governmental accounting standards board (GASB).
  4. Analyze governmental activities related to revenue.
  5. Analyze governmental activities related to expenditures and expenses.
  6. Analyze governmental activities related to capital projects, debt service, capital assets, and investment in marketable securities.
  7. Analyze governmental activities related to long-term debt obligations.
  8. Assess the process that governments use to account for permanent and fiduciary funds.
  9. Assess the accounting and financial reporting requirements for not-for-profit organizations.
  10. Evaluate the auditing process for governments and not-for-profit organizations.
  11. Analyze the complexities of financial analysis, including assessing economic conditions, calculating, and interpreting financial ratios.
  12. Use technology and information resources to research issues in government and not-for-profit accounting.
  13. Write clearly and concisely about government and not-for-profit accounting using proper writing mechanics.
Course Guide
FIN 100 Principles of Finance
FIN 215 Personal Financial Planning
FIN 317 Financing Entrepreneurships

The course explores the various aspects of financing an entrepreneurial venture. Emphasis will be placed on crafting a business plan, forms of ownership, and exploring funding options.

  1. Apply the fundamentals of entrepreneurial financing.
  2. Analyze the financial planning needs of various businesses.
  3. Perform fundamental analysis of a business.
  4. Assess securities’ laws both at federal and state level in relation to venture financing.
  5. Examine the equity approach to valuing a new venture.
  6. Analyze the venture capital process.
  7. Compare and contrast different types of entrepreneurial financing.
  8. Examine and discuss security structures.
  9. Analyze financial constraints and exit strategies for ventures.
  10. Use technology and information resources to research issues in financing entrepreneurships.
  11. Write clearly and concisely about financing entrepreneurships using proper writing mechanics.
Course Guide
FIN 320 Investments

Covers portfolio management, including the management of investments in stocks, bonds and other financial instruments. Examines individual financial instruments in depth and the investment strategies of shifting the relative amounts held by the investor during changing economic conditions.

  1. Describe common debt and equity securities, and analyze the relative risks and returns associated with each.
  2. Explain how the securities business works through stockbrokers and investment bankers using the physical exchanges, network exchanges, and OTC markets.
  3. Perform and interpret basic security analyses using indexes, averages, and various technical methods, as well as compounding, discounting, and forecasting.
  4. Explain how to apply various strategies in the management of financial investment portfolios in order to optimize profits (and minimize taxes) within acceptable risks.
  5. Find and utilize sources of pertinent investing information on a company, its industry, the economy as a whole, and the international environment to analyze investment potential.
  6. Explain the considerations for investments of options, convertibles, warrants, rights, and commodities.
  7. Illustrate how to use hybrid and derivative instruments such as convertibles, warrants, rights, options, and futures contracts in investment strategies.
  8. Explain the mechanics of retirement plans such as IRA, Roth IRA, and 401(k).
  9. Use technology and information resources to research issues in investments.
  10. Write clearly and concisely about investments using proper writing mechanics.
Course Guide
FIN 350 Financial Markets and Institutions

Examines the various types of financial markets, financial intermediaries, and the types of transactions supported by each market. Analyzes the sources and uses of funds by commercial banks, management concepts for banks, and how commercial banks are regulated.

  1. Describe the various types of financial markets and the types of transactions supported by each market in the U.S. and globally.
  2. Analyze the factors that affect interest rates and forecast interest rate changes.
  3. Explain the operation of the Federal Reserve and describe how monetary policy is used in the U.S. and other countries to manage the economy.
  4. Determine the valuation of various types of securities.
  5. Develop strategies for the use of bond markets by investors and firms to meet stated financial objectives.
  6. Assess the risks in the various types of financial markets and develop strategies to manage the risks.
  7. Explain the sources and uses of funds by commercial banks and how commercial banks are regulated.
  8. Formulate strategies for evaluating performance and managing liquidity, risks, and capital in banking operations.
  9. Use technology and information resources to research issues in financial markets and institutions.
  10. Write clearly and concisely about financial markets and institutions using proper writing mechanics.
Course Guide
FIN 355 Financial Risk Analysis

This course provides sufficient institutional detail of the primary risks faced by the major types of financial firms and the applicability of these risks for the financial manager. Topics covered include asset valuation, the economic role of money markets and how this role relates to security valuation and risk analysis, risk measurement, options pricing, derivative risk management, measuring and comparing risk exposures across financial markets, risks and rewards of international financial markets, and recent developments in the practice of risk management. Cases and industry applications are used.

  1. Define risk, return, and the three aspects of market efficiency.
  2. Evaluate the impact of risks faced by financial institutions.
  3. Identify the economic role of the money markets.
  4. Describe market fundamentals such as interest rates, inflation, and money supply.
  5. Examine the basics of bond and mortgage valuations.
  6. Analyze stock prices and valuations.
  7. Describe the factors that determine exchange rates.
  8. Demonstrate how to use derivatives to limit risk.
  9. Explain commonly practiced risk management techniques.
  10. Evaluate risk management techniques that apply to all fixed income markets.
  11. Use technology and information resources to research issues in financial risk analysis.
  12. Write clearly and concisely about financial risk analysis using proper writing mechanics.
Course Guide
FIN 405 Advanced Financial Management

This course provides an extensive coverage of corporate finance theory and the applicability of this theory for the financial manager. Topics covered include capital budgeting under uncertainty; the relevance of capital structure decisions on security valuation and risk; mergers and acquisitions; option pricing; real options; measuring and managing a firm’s risk exposures; risks and rewards of international financial markets. Cases are used.

  1. Describe the main components of the corporate finance theory.
  2. Evaluate applications of financial management for the financial manager.
  3. Formulate approaches to current asset management, capital budgeting, financial structure, dividend policy, long-term financing, and mergers.
  4. Analyze approaches to current asset management, capital budgeting, financial structure, dividend policy, long-term financing, and mergers.
  5. Describe the use of corporate planning models.
  6. Use technology and information resources to research issues in financial management.
Course Guide
FIN 410 Commercial Bank Management

This course covers the theory and practice of commercial banking from a financial-management perspective. It focuses on the dynamic and rapidly changing financial-services industry. It explores modern financial management decision-making and highlights the importance of adapting to change and creating value as the way for firms to succeed. Students will acquire skills in technology banking (e-Money, e-Banking and e-Commerce) and risks and valuation, loans, management of liquidity reserves, investment portfolio, and sources of funds. Students develop skills in managing commercial banks through an understanding of bank objectives, functions, policies, organization and structure, and by evaluating different types of services and bank regulations.

  1. Analyze the organization and structure of the banking and financial-services industry.
  2. Analyze financial statements and performance of financial firms.
  3. Apply the tools for managing and hedging against risks.
  4. Examine the process of managing investment portfolios and liquidity positions for financial firms.
  5. Evaluate the process of managing sources of funds for a financial firm.
  6. Evaluate the process of providing loans to business and consumers.
  7. Assess the avenues to manage the future in a global marketplace.
  8. Use technology and information resources to research issues in commercial bank management and operations.
  9. Write clearly and concisely about commercial bank management and operations using proper writing mechanics.
Course Guide

Business

BUS 100 Introduction to Business
BUS 107 Fundamentals of E-Business

Examines the development of electronic commerce, the basic technologies used to conduct e-business, and the various forms of electronic business. Presents marketing models used in e-business strategy. Examines the processes for business-to-business and business-to-consumer transactions. Reviews the electronic commerce infrastructure, designing and managing online storefronts, payment options, security, privacy, and the legal and ethical challenges of electronic business.

Course Guide
BUS 230 Purchasing and Materials Management

Examines integral aspects of purchasing and materials management including function, organization, quality and quantity considerations, pricing policies, supplier selection, and ethical and legal implications. Reviews purchasing procedures, value analysis, inventory control, warehousing and traffic, capital equipment, make-or-buy decision-making, automation, budgets, and institutional and governmental purchasing practices.

  1. Explain the functions, roles, and terminology of purchasing and supply management.
  2. Recognize the alignment of purchasing and supply management with an organization’s goals and strategies.
  3. Describe the Purchasing and Supply Management process and technology.
  4. Explain make or buy, insourcing, and outsourcing decisions.
  5. Identify various methods of identifying supply need and specification.
  6. Explain the dichotomy of profit leverage and expense effects of purchasing and supply management in an organization.
  7. Discuss the roles of quality, quantity, inventory, and delivery in purchasing and supply management.
  8. Discuss price and cost management in making supply decisions.
  9. Describe supplier selection, evaluation, supply research opportunities, and future trends.
  10. Explain the legal and ethics considerations in purchasing and supply management.
  11. Describe global supply management.
  12. Use technology and information resources to research issues in purchasing and supply management.
  13. Write clearly and concisely about issues in purchasing and supply management using proper writing mechanics.
Course Guide
BUS 300 Public Relations

Surveys the practice of public relations in business, nonprofit organizations, and governmental institutions. Examines the major forms of media used in public relations: news releases, broadcast publicity, public service announcements, and institutional advertising.

  1. Explain the basic functions of public relations, how it can be used to support corporate goals, and how it can be integrated into marketing strategy.
  2. Analyze a communication process, identify dysfunctional aspects of the process, and develop action plans to improve the communications.
  3. Incorporate ethical and legal parameters in planning and executing public relations actions.
  4. Formulate and plan the implementation of public relations strategies to accomplish stated public relations objectives relative to various publics (media, employees, communities, governments, consumers, and international entities).
  5. Develop a public relations research plan to analyze audiences, assess alternatives, and develop needed information to support decisions.
  6. Formulate and plan the implementation of public relations strategies to deal with crisis situations.
  7. Use technology and information resources to research issues in public relations.
  8. Write clearly and concisely about public relations issues using proper writing mechanics.
Course Guide
BUS 302 Management Concepts
BUS 309 Business Ethics

Examines the applications of ethical principles through consideration of typical problem areas encountered in organizations. The course focuses on the ethical perspectives of business decision-making and policy development in a variety of key areas including individual behavior, human resource management, work environments, marketing, property rights, and international business. The analysis of case situations will illustrate the application of various ethical approaches (utility, individual rights, and justice) in managing organizations.

  1. Explain the considerations for and process of ethical business decision making to balance corporate and social responsibilities and address moral, economic, and legal concerns.
  2. Analyze selected business situations using the predominant ethical theories, such as utilitarian, Kantian, and virtue ethics to guide ethical business decision making.
  3. Explain the concepts of justice and the factors that constitute rights using the predominant ethical theories such as utilitarian, Kantian, and virtue ethics.
  4. Explain the role of free trade and government in an economic system, the key features of capitalism, and the critical business ethics issues associated with international business.
  5. Recommend viable policy options that address the selected business areas, reflect key ethical considerations, and foster an ethical work environment.
  6. Analyze the concepts of public safety and government regulation along with the role of business responsibility.
  7. Recommend ways in which businesses can be partners with nature by applying the concepts of business ethics, business ecology, and environmental ethics.
  8. Describe the implications and impact of various civil liberty laws in the workplace, such as hiring, promotion, discipline, discharge, and wage discrimination.
  9. Analyze the effects of unethical actions by company officials on the company, its employees, and society.
  10. Analyze the ethical issues related to job discrimination, affirmative action, and sexual harassment.
  11. Use technology and information resources to research issues in business ethics.
  12. Write clearly and concisely about business ethics using proper writing mechanics.
Course Guide
BUS 310 Human Resource Management
BUS 322 Organizational Behavior
BUS 325 Global Human Resource Management

Examines the considerations for human resource management in support of global business operations. Analyzes the sources of labor, business strategy, corporate culture, and cultural differences as elements of global human resource planning. Reviews fundamental human resource issues such as compensation, productivity, and training.

  1. Describe the nature of globalization, cultures, and labor markets, and assess the impact on human resource management (HRM).
  2. Analyze international business strategy to identify human resource requirements and formulate supporting HRM plans that can improve productivity and contribute to the firm’s competitiveness.
  3. Analyze staffing alternatives for foreign operations and address the considerations for the use of expatriates versus localization or third-country nationals.
  4. Analyze recruiting and selection strategies that can be used to effectively meet organizational requirements for operating in multiple countries.
  5. Examine training programs to improve performance throughout a multinational corporation and address the considerations for effective learning in a diverse workforce of expatriates, host country nationals, and third-country nationals.
  6. Analyze performance management processes to assess and improve performance throughout a multinational corporation.
  7. Examine compensation strategies to support international operations and balance global operational efficiencies with responsiveness to local labor conditions.
  8. Analyze effective approaches to the broad spectrum of employee relations issues, including fostering ethical behavior, labor relations, and work conditions.
  9. Use technology and information resources to research issues in global HRM.
  10. Write clearly and concisely about global HRM issues using proper writing mechanics.
Course Guide
BUS 335 Staffing Organizations

Examines the role of staffing to support an organization’s strategy and improve productivity. Reviews the key legal compliance issues associated with staffing organizations. Emphasis is placed on HRM planning, job analysis, effective recruitment strategies, developing selection processes, and formulation of staffing plans. Provides considerations for employee retention.

  1. Explain the role of staffing to support an organization’s strategy and improve productivity.
  2. Develop a model for staffing an organization that supports the firm’s Human Resources Management strategy and sustains productive operations.
  3. Summarize the key legal compliance issues associated with staffing organizations.
  4. Explain the planning considerations for staffing organizations, the use of job analysis, and the components of a staffing plan.
  5. Develop recruitment plans using both internal and external recruitment.
  6. Design a selection process that incorporates a variety of assessment methods and a supporting decision method for candidate selection.
  7. Identify the factors affecting employee retention and develop a workforce retention program for an organization.
  8. Use technology and information resources to research issues in staffing organizations.
  9. Write clearly and concisely about staffing organizations using proper writing mechanics.
Course Guide
BUS 365 E-Business Security and Controls

Provides a framework for analyzing and formulating electronic commerce strategy and business solutions. Examines the application of information technology in improving strategic management, facilitating the operations of a firm’s supply chain, and supporting the execution of enterprise systems within an organization. Surveys critical security issues of Web-based operations and e-commerce, and considerations to manage these risks. Appropriate cases are used to illustrate concepts of conducting business on the Internet and applying electronic commerce mechanisms.

  1. Explain the use of knowledge management, enterprise systems, and the application of decision support systems to improve performance and strategic management.
  2. Explain the operation and strategic applications of various information system architectures and the supporting infrastructures.
  3. Analyze the principal security issues of Web-based operations and e-commerce and develop strategies to manage these risks.
  4. Describe the critical ethical and legal issues associated with conducting e-commerce and develop approaches to maintain appropriate ethical behavior.
  5. Explain the operation and strategic applications of the major electronic commerce mechanisms to process business transactions.
  6. Formulate e-commerce marketing strategies to service various market situations between businesses, consumers, and government.
  7. Formulate IT-enabled strategies that firms can use to gain a competitive advantage and control operations.
  8. Describe the role of information technology in facilitating a firm’s supply chain management.
  9. Use technology and information resources to research issues in e-business security and controls.
  10. Write clearly and concisely about e-business security and controls using proper writing mechanics.
Course Guide
BUS 375 Project Management

Presents the fundamentals of the project management process and examines application of the process. Reviews the stages and activities in the project life cycle, the organization for project management, and various project control and evaluation processes. Introduces considerations for negotiation and human resource management concerns in project management.

  1. Describe the key concepts, processes and components of project management.
  2. Analyze the interrelationships among the principal elements (time, cost, resources) in the performance of project management.
  3. Evaluate the general systems factors affecting performance throughout the project life cycle.
  4. Design an organizational structure, staff a project office, and establish a communications system to effectively manage projects.
  5. Analyze the role of executive management in the life of a project.
  6. Apply the project manager’s critical skills, in terms of project leadership, team building, time management, conflict management, and effective communication with executive sponsors, peers, team members, and project clients.
  7. Analyze the ethical considerations in project management.
  8. Evaluate the quality of planning throughout a project’s life cycle.
  9. Construct project schedules using network techniques and reports for both internal and external presentation.
  10. Develop pricing and estimating strategies to manage global projects.
  11. Create cost control procedures.
  12. Assess and develop actions to manage risk in a project.
  13. Assess a project’s overall quality by analyzing its contract management, performance measurement tools, and implementation leadership.
  14. Use technology and information resources to research issues in project management.
Course Guide
BUS 402 Small Business Management

Provides the basic principles of operating and managing a small business. Topics include buying, merchandising, pricing, promotions, inventory management, customer service, location decisions, and planning. Reviews strategic planning considerations relative to operating a small business.

  1. Analyze the nature of entrepreneurship, business ethics, and social responsibility in managing a successful small business.
  2. Analyze the business strategy and supporting business plan for a small business concept.
  3. Describe and analyze the necessary activities and key decisions to start a small business.
  4. Analyze the key financial management considerations in operating a small business.
  5. Develop a guerrilla marketing strategy for a small business.
  6. Analyze the role of pricing, credit, and equity financing in defining a business strategy.
  7. Describe and analyze the essential considerations in planning for international business and the range of strategies typically used by small businesses to service global markets.
  8. Determine the various control and support functions needed to manage a small business effectively.
  9. Examine the principal legal issues in managing a small business and the considerations for planning management succession in a family business.
  10. Use technology and information resources to research issues in small business management.
  11. Write clearly and concisely about small business management using proper writing mechanics.
Course Guide
BUS 405 Labor Relations

Presents the principles of labor-management relations and basic requirements of federal labor laws. Examines the role of the Federal Labor Relations Authority, the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service, and other third parties. Includes the topics of union representation rights and obligations, employee rights, organizing, election procedures, unfair labor practices, collective bargaining negotiations, mediation impasses, grievances, and arbitrations.

  1. Summarize the historical and legal framework which provides the foundations for the American system of labor / management relations.
  2. Analyze the actions of unions and management to determine basic compliance with the major U.S. federal labor laws.
  3. Analyze the motivations, objectives, and problems encountered by both the labor unions and managers functioning in the present business environment.
  4. Explain the process for organizing and for decertifying unions.
  5. Formulate a strategy for negotiating a labor agreement and dealing with potential impasses in the bargaining process.
  6. Analyze the principle economic and administrative issues addressed during collective bargaining and develop a bargaining position.
  7. Develop policies and procedures to administer a labor contract and resolve disputes.
  8. Summarize the labor-management relations models and unique considerations of the public sector.
  9. Analyze the nature of labor unions globally and their potential impact on firms conducting international business.
  10. Use technology and information resources to research issues in labor relations.
  11. Write clearly and concisely about labor relations using proper writing mechanics.
Course Guide
BUS 407 Training and Development

Presents the concepts of learning (cognitive and behaviorist), principles of instructional design, and the relationship of motivation and learning. Analyzes the phases of the training process model and the activities associated with each phase. Reviews how to develop viable training programs to fit a variety of organizational requirements for both employee and management training and development.

  1. Describe concepts, meanings, and trends in training.
  2. Explain the importance of aligning training with organizational strategy.
  3. Evaluate theories associated with learning, motivation, and employee performance.
  4. Identify when to conduct a Training Needs Analysis (TNA).
  5. Analyze the various approaches to performing a Training Needs Analysis.
  6. Develop strategies for training design.
  7. Compare and contrast traditional training methods.
  8. Analyze computer-based training methods.
  9. Examine the process of training development and implementation.
  10. Determine the reasons for the evaluation of training.
  11. Describe the key areas of organizational training.
  12. Summarize the approaches to employee and management development.
  13. Use technology and information resources to research issues in training and development.
  14. Write clearly and concisely about training and development using proper writing mechanics.
Course Guide
BUS 409 Compensation Management

Introduces and analyzes the basic concepts of compensation administration in organizations. Provides an intensive study of the wage system, methods of job evaluation, wage and salary structures, and the legal constraints on compensation programs.

  1. Analyze how compensation practice can be applied to positively impact an organization and its stakeholders.
  2. Examine the ways in which laws, labor unions, and market factors impact companies’ compensation practices.
  3. Evaluate the effectiveness of traditional bases for pay (seniority and merit) against incentive-based and person-focused compensation approaches.
  4. Compare and contrast internally consistent and market-competitive compensation systems.
  5. Analyze the fundamental principles of pay structure design.
  6. Evaluate the role of benefits in strategic compensation.
  7. Suggest viable options to current practices regarding executive compensation.
  8. Make recommendations for leveraging flexible and contingent workers for any given organization.
  9. Determine the best possible approach for the compensation of expatriates.
  10. Analyze differences between compensation, benefits, and legal and regulatory influences in the United States and the rest of the world.
  11. Use technology and information resources to research issues in compensation management.
  12. Write clearly and concisely about compensation management using proper writing mechanics.
Course Guide
BUS 430 Operations Management

This course covers the key concepts related to operations management within an organization. Topics include strategic issues related to designing products and delivery services, making capacity and location decisions, and operating processes and control systems.

  1. Apply the concept of operations management.
  2. Compare and contrast the difference between a supply chain and a value chain.
  3. Analyze the types of measures used for decision making.
  4. Analyze the five key competitive priorities and their relationship to operations strategy.
  5. Analyze different types of technology and their role in manufacturing and service operations.
  6. Evaluate the processes used in designing and producing goods and services.
  7. Determine four layout patterns and when they should be used.
  8. Utilize the concept of supply chain management.
  9. Employ the concept of capacity management.
  10. Analyze forecasting approaches as they relate to demand planning.
  11. Evaluate the management of inventories and resources.
  12. Interpret the concepts of scheduling and sequencing.
  13. Explain quality management, quality control, and statistical process control.
  14. Determine the four principles of lean operating systems.
  15. Analyze the key issues associated with project management.
  16. Use technology and information resources to research issues in operations management.
  17. Write clearly and concisely about operations management using proper writing mechanics.
Course Guide
BUS 463 Entrepreneurship Feasibility and Analysis

This course provides students opportunities for analysis, synthesis, prescription, and application of entrepreneurship concepts. Students will use real-work entrepreneurship cases and apply critical thinking and decision-making skills involving complex entrepreneurship decisions.

  1. Analyze the business creation and start-up process.
  2. Evaluate the financial requirements and management of a small business.
  3. Analyze the human resource needs of the small business.
  4. Build an effective business plan.
  5. Manage the process for innovation and development in a small business.
  6. Analyze strategies for growth and business sustainability.
  7. Use technology and information resources to research issues in entrepreneurship feasibility and analysis.
  8. Write clearly and concisely about entrepreneurship feasibility and analysis using proper writing mechanics.
Course Guide
BUS 490 Business Policy

Provides an opportunity for students to integrate management principles, techniques, and theories by applying previously acquired knowledge of all business functional areas to analyze, develop, and implement business strategy. Utilizes cases from a variety of organizations, with emphasis on problem identification, analysis, and decision-making on strategic issues.

  1. Explain the concepts and models of the strategic management process, including strategy formulation, implementation, and evaluation.
  2. Conduct an industry analysis (external audit) and an internal audit of an organization, and present the results using various matrices and analysis tools.
  3. Describe the application of the various types of basic alternative strategies and considerations for their use.
  4. Formulate business strategies through an analysis of the operating environments (external and internal, domestic and international).  
  5. Integrate knowledge of the various business disciplines and develop alternative strategic actions to fit a variety of operational environments.
  6. Explain the key management issues associated with strategy implementation and the considerations for managing change.
  7. Describe the activities involved in strategy evaluation and control, and explain the role of contingency planning in strategic management.
  8. Develop a strategic evaluation process to assess performance.
  9. Describe the advantages for any business of fostering an ethically, environmentally, and socially responsible organizational culture.  
  10. Use technology and information resources to research issues in business policy.
  11. Write clearly and concisely about business policy using proper writing mechanics.
Course Guide

Information Systems & Technology

CIS 105 Introduction to Information Systems

This course introduces students to the general purpose of information systems in organizations and their use of personal productivity software. Students will demonstrate tasks in common application software to include word processing, web browsing, spreadsheet modeling, database management, and presentation graphics.

  1. Describe the purpose and use of contemporary information systems in organizations.
  2. Distinguish among computing technologies in use by modern organizations.
  3. Recognize common features of personal productivity software.
  4. Use word processing software to create and format documents.
  5. Understand and use the features of electronic mail.
  6. Use web browsing software to search and navigate online web sites.
  7. Use spreadsheet modeling techniques to create and format spreadsheets.
  8. Use database management software to develop and query a database.
  9. Use presentation graphic software to create and format presentations.
  10. Use technology and information resources to research issues in information systems.
  11. Write clearly and concisely about introductory information systems topics using proper writing mechanics and technical style conventions.
Course Guide
CIS 106 Introduction to Information Technology

This course provides a foundational overview to the discipline of information technology that illuminates key computing concepts and describes how those concepts relate to other computing disciplines. Students are presented the diverse context in which information technology is used and the challenges inherent in the diffusion of innovative technologies.

  1. Explain how the components of information technology systems interrelate.
  2. Distinguish among the complexities in information technology to include abstraction, modeling, versioning, standards, and use of appropriate tools.
  3. Explain the complexities in an information technology environment by applying best practices and using appropriate technologies and methodologies.
  4. Describe the role of the information technology professional as the user advocate.
  5. Demonstrate why adaptability and interpersonal skills are important to an information technology professional.
  6. Illustrate the use of information and communication technologies to solve problems as an information technology professional.
  7. Outline why the Information Assurance and Security perspective needs to pervade all aspects of information technology.
  8. Explain how organizational context is influenced by the development and deployment of information technology systems.
  9. Evaluate the ethical concerns that information technologies raise in society, and the impact of information technologies on crime, terrorism, or war.
  10. Use technology and information resources to research issues in information technology.
  11. Write clearly and concisely about introductory information technology topics using proper writing mechanics and technical style conventions.
Course Guide
CIS 107 Microcomputer Applications

This course introduces students to personal productivity software for use in organizations. Students will be presented with software and materials to develop competencies and documents in word processing, web browsing, spreadsheet modeling, database management, and presentation graphic applications. Topics include the creation and modeling of persuasive organizational documents, reports, and presentations.

  1. Describe the purpose and use of microcomputer applications in organizations.
  2. Distinguish among the common features of microcomputer applications.
  3. Use word processing software to create and format documents.
  4. Understand and use the features of electronic mail.
  5. Use web browsing software to search and navigate online web sites.
  6. Use spreadsheet modeling techniques to create and format spreadsheets.
  7. Use database management software to develop and query a database.
  8. Use presentation graphic software to create and format presentations.
  9. Use technology and information resources to research issues in information systems.
  10. Write clearly and concisely about topics related to microcomputer applications using proper writing mechanics and technical style conventions.
Course Guide
CIS 109 Introduction to Management Information Systems

This course covers structures and concepts of management information systems. It emphasizes the importance of integrated information as used in the decision process and the information flows associated with each decision point in a business structure. It enables the development of a philosophy of information systems administration.

  1. Describe how and why information systems are used today.
  2. Demonstrate an understanding of the technology, people, and organizational components of information systems.
  3. Explain the major components of an information systems infrastructure.
  4. Evaluate the ethical concerns that information systems raise in society and the impact of information systems on crime, terrorism, or war.
  5. Explain how to secure information systems resources that focus on both human and technological safeguards.
  6. Identify how to mitigate risks as well as plan for and recover from disasters.
  7. Identify emerging technologies that enable new forms of communication, collaboration, and partnering.
  8. Explain how information systems are enabling new forms of commerce between individuals, organizations, and governments.
  9. Recognize how information systems are used for competitive advantage.
  10. Demonstrate the value of information systems investments as well as learn to formulate a business case for a new information system, including estimation of both costs and benefits.
  11. Outline how organizations develop and acquire information systems and technologies.
  12. Recognize how enterprise systems foster stronger relationships with customers and suppliers and how these systems are widely used to enforce organizational structures and processes.
  13. Explain how various types of information systems provide the information needed to gain business intelligence to support the decision making for the different levels and functions of the organization.
  14. Use technology and information resources to research issues in information systems.
  15. Write clearly and concisely about management information systems using proper writing mechanics.
Course Guide
CIS 110 Computer Programming Design

This course involves extensive work in the development of the logic required in the development of application programs. The course applies the methods of program design and development, using a structured approach. Included in the course will be the learning of the following concepts: proper documentation techniques, sequence, selection, iteration, modules, and arrays. The student will demonstrate a fundamental understanding of these concepts by writing pseudocode and drawing flowcharts as a precursor to the writing of the programs. The demonstration will be made in examinations and in laboratory work.

  1. Demonstrate the use of algorithms and pseudocoding to the problem-solving process.
  2. Distinguish among the basic types, steps, and properties of programming.
  3. Apply the techniques of functional decomposition, modularization techniques, and debugging strategies into program design.
  4. Describe the features and fundamental data structures of programming design.
  5. Select and create the appropriate conditional and iteration constructs for a given programming task.
  6. Design and write programs using the appropriate data structure and fundamental programming constructs for a given problem.
  7. Select and describe relational comparison operators, AND / OR logic and their precedence for a given problem.
  8. Describe the use of arrays and subscripts and the steps involved in declaring, initializing, loading, and searching arrays.
  9. Demonstrate an understanding of the data hierarchy for files, basic file operations, and sequential file processing.
  10. Explain the types and uses of files on permanent storage devices.
  11. Describe the process of sorting records and the bubble sort technique.
  12. Explain and identify object-oriented concepts.
  13. Identify object-oriented classes and also the attributes and methods they contain.
  14. Explain the use and benefits of object-oriented programming and event-driven programming.
  15. Develop design documents for an interactive event-driven program.
  16. Use technology and information resources to research issues in computer programming design.
  17. Write clearly and concisely about computer programming design topics using proper writing mechanics and technical style conventions.
Course Guide
CIS 111 Introduction to Relational Database ManagementSystems

This course provides fundamental database concepts to develop students’ knowledge of database management. It also addresses the most current database issues such as database design, data integrity, concurrent updates, and data security. Special features include detailed coverage of the relational model, Structured Query Language (SQL), and views, database design, database administration and management. Finally, the course introduces advanced topics including distributed databases, data warehouses, stored procedures, and triggers fostering an introductory understanding of database management.

  1. Describe the role of databases and database management systems in managing organizational data and information.
  2. Recognize the historical development of database management systems and logical data models.
  3. Explain how data is physically stored and accessed.
  4. Recognize the basic file organization techniques.
  5. Compose conceptual data modeling techniques to capture the information requirements.
  6. Recognize the purpose and principles of normalizing a relational database structure.
  7. Design a relational database so that it is at least in 3NF.
  8. Prepare database design documents using the data definition, data manipulation, and data control language components of the SQL language.
  9. Demonstrate the basic mechanisms for accessing relational databases from various types of application development environments.
  10. Distinguish the role of databases and database management systems in the context of enterprise systems.
  11. Analyze the key principles of data security and identify data security risk and violations in data management system design.
  12. Describe the core concepts of data quality and their application in an organizational context.
  13. Summarize the difference between on-line transaction processing (OLTP) and online analytic processing (OLAP), and their relationship among business intelligence, data warehousing and data mining.
  14. Summarize how database systems support enterprise and web-based applications.
  15. Evaluate the ethical concerns inherent in database management systems and how these concerns effect legislation or organizational policies.
  16. Use technology and information resources to research issues in database systems.
  17. Write clearly and concisely about relational database management systems using proper writing mechanics and technical style conventions.
Course Guide
CIS 155 Operating Systems

Covers the development and execution of structured shell programs including scripts, menus, I/O redirection, pipes, variables, and other UNIX and Windows commands. Operating systems administration techniques also are covered including electronic mail, editors, online help, and file and directory techniques.

  1. Define common commands in UNIX and their usage.
  2. List the UNIX file attributes and describe how to set them.
  3. Describe how hardware is identified and managed by UNIX.
  4. Demonstrate how to create an edit a document in UNIX.
  5. Identify a UNIX program and make executable.
  6. Describe the way that data is stored in the UNIX file system.
  7. Synthesize current information related to topics in this course using the APA format.
Course Guide
CIS 170 Information Technology in Criminal Justice

This course examines how information technology is used within the criminal justice system, Homeland Security, and private security. Topics covered include information systems and communication technologies used to prevent and investigate crime and manage security. Students will develop fundamental technical and research skills applicable to criminal justice.

  1. Explain digital crime and digital terrorism activities.
  2. Describe law enforcement roles and responses.
  3. Identify information system attacks and countermeasures.
  4. Describe the criminology of computer crime.
  5. Analyze the types of digital criminals and hackers.
  6. Summarize white-collar crimes and criminal tools.
  7. Explain computer viruses and malicious computer code.
  8. Analyze the different types of crimes on the World Wide Web involving victimization, sex crimes, and obscenity.
  9. Explain the various digital laws and legislation in support of law enforcement.
  10. Explain the procedures in the investigation of computer-related crime.
  11. Describe the technologies and processes involved in digital forensics.
  12. Describe future trends in digital crime and terrorism.
  13. Evaluate the ethical concerns that information technologies raise in society and the impact of information technologies on crime, terrorism, or war.
  14. Use technology and information resources to research issues in information technology in criminal justice.
  15. Write clearly and concisely about information technology in criminal justice topics using proper writing mechanics and technical style conventions.
Course Guide
CIS 175 Introduction to Networking

This course introduces students to the basic concepts networks. It covers basic topologies, protocols, performance issues, and software for LANS/WANS. The course assumes student has basic computer knowledge.

  1. Explain the basic components and media of network systems and distinguish between LANs, MANs, and WANs.
  2. Describe and differentiate the different layers of the Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) model.
  3. Summarize current networking standards and how standards bodies and the standardization process impact networking technology.
  4. Explain the OSI and Internet models as they apply to contemporary communication protocols.
  5. Contrast why different technologies are deployed in different contexts of networking, such as topology, bandwidth, distance, and number of users.
  6. Describe the TCP/IP protocols and various functions among the application layer.
  7. Analyze and compare the characteristics of various communication protocols and how they provide application requirements.
  8. Explain the relationship of bandwidth and latency and how they impact throughput in a data communications channel.
  9. Explain and differentiate among network hardware devices and components.
  10. Use operating system commands to monitor and control IP configurations.
  11. Compare and contrast among network operating systems.
  12. Configure and install new user accounts to the Windows server operating system.
  13. Use networking commands and basic troubleshooting operations in TCP/IP networks to demonstrate the ability to identify and solve basic networking problems.
  14. Describe VOIP applications and the role of QoS in a networked environment.
  15. Describe security policy, practices, encryption techniques, and design considerations in support of business operations in a networked environment.
  16. Explain the role of integrity and availability in a networked environment.
  17. Deploy a basic Ethernet LAN and compare it to other network topologies.
  18. Use technology and information resources to research issues in networking.
  19. Write clearly and concisely about introductory networking topics using proper writing mechanics and technical style conventions.
Course Guide
CIS 210 Systems Analysis and Development

This course provides an understanding of the methodology and scope of business information systems analysis and design, and their relationship to the management process. The systems approach and its techniques of problem-solving are emphasized.

  1. Describe the types of business needs that can be addressed using information technology-based solutions.
  2. Identify system stakeholders and formulate their needs.
  3. Create requirements for a system through a formal technique that enables a productive change in a way the business is conducted.  
  4. Summarize effective communication techniques with various organizational stakeholders to collect information using a variety of techniques and to convey proposed solution characteristics to them.
  5. Demonstrate the methods to initiate, specify, and prioritize information systems projects and determine various aspects of feasibility of these projects.
  6. Identify and classify the roles played by external users of a system.
  7. Create information systems projects using formal project management methods.
  8. Summarize the various requirements modeling techniques.
  9. Distinguish between non-functional and functional requirements.
  10. Explain and give examples of use cases and their structure.
  11. Create a use case based on relating functional requirements.
  12. Explain how use cases drive testing throughout the system life cycle.
  13. Explain various systems acquisition alternatives, including the use of packaged systems (such as ERP, CRM, SCM) and outsourced design and development resources.
  14. Create and compare acquisition alternatives systematically.
  15. Design high-level logical system characteristics (user interface design, design of data, and information requirements).
  16. Write clear and concise business requirements documents and convert them into technical specifications.
  17. Analyze and articulate ethical, cultural, and legal issues and their feasibilities among alternative solutions.
  18. Explain how requirements gathering and quality assurance fit into a system development life cycle.
  19. Use contemporary CASE tools in process and data modeling.
  20. Use technology and information resources to research issues in systems analysis and development.
  21. Write clearly and concisely about systems analysis and development topics using proper writing mechanics and technical style conventions.
Course Guide
CIS 242 C++ Programming I

This course introduces students to the fundamental constructs of the C++ object-oriented programming language. Students will test, document and design business-oriented programs. Topics include data types and objects, encapsulation, polymorphism, and inheritance.

  1. Demonstrate the proper use and application of syntax in the C++ programming language.
  2. Write programs using basic data types in the C++ programming language.
  3. Design, implement, test, and debug simple programs in C++.
  4. Program simple and complex instruction sequences that are repeated multiple times.
  5. Create programs that use functions and procedures.
  6. Discuss the significance and use of variables.
  7. Demonstrate the ability to decompose complex programming tasks.
  8. Design and implement classes that solve programming problems.
  9. Discuss and apply vectors and arrays as solutions to programming problems.
  10. Discuss how to declare, initialize and use pointers.
  11. Discuss the concepts of inheritance and polymorphism.
  12. Discuss the use of streams and accessing files from C++ programs.
  13. Use technology and information resources to research issues in C++ Programming.
  14. Write clearly and concisely about introductory C++ Programming topics using proper writing mechanics and technical style conventions.
Course Guide
CIS 267 Visual Basic Programming

This course provides students with the knowledge and techniques needed to design and build distributed applications using the Visual Basic programming language. Students will use disciplined coding style, including documentation and coding style to write well-designed programs that solve business problems.

  1. Apply graphical user interface design principles.
  2. Design conditional and iteration constructs appropriate to a given programming task.
  3. Design well-written and readable programs using a disciplined coding style, including documentation and indentation standards.
  4. Create Visual Basic applications that deploy on multiple platforms such as Web pages, Windows, and Office environments.
  5. Demonstrate how to implement logic involving sequence, selection, and repetition using Visual Basic.
  6. Create useful and well-designed programs that use subroutines, functions, menus, dialog boxes, and other related form objects to solve practical business problems.
  7. Create appealing, interactive Web applications that can be delivered and executed on the Internet.
  8. Demonstrate the ability to organize complex programs by using procedures and to anticipate and prevent errors by managing exceptions.
  9. Describe how to create variables and assign values.
  10. Explain operators and how they can be used to change values and compare expressions.
  11. Design sophisticated, professional programs by using arrays and files that handle data and to make programs more robust by defining classes and using the power of inheritance.
  12. Construct Visual Basic programs in a response to common business problems.
  13. Use technology and information resources to research issues in Visual Basic programming.
  14. Write clearly and concisely about Visual Basic programming using proper writing mechanics and technical style conventions.
Course Guide
CIS 273 Web Design and Development

This course presents students the design, implementation, and testing of Web-based applications including related software, databases, scripting techniques, interfaces and digital media. It also covers social, ethical, and security issues arising from the Web, e-Commerce and social networking software applications.

  1. Describe the structure of the World Wide Web as interconnected hypertext documents.
  2. Describe the importance of the HTTP protocol in Web applications.
  3. Create and validate HTML documents.
  4. Demonstrate an understanding of XML syntax and show how to display XML in Web applications.
  5. Create presentations using Cascading Style Sheets and DHTML.
  6. Design interactive Web applications with an object-based client-side scripting language.
  7. Distinguish among data entry and validation techniques in client-side and server-side programming.
  8. Summarize client-side and server-side security issues.
  9. Describe the use of server-side backend databases in Websites and Web applications.
  10. Describe technologies used in Web services, including open source languages and packages, proprietary languages and packages, and enterprise Web development and distributed Web applications.
  11. Compare and contrast open source and proprietary server software.
  12. Explain the use of Web standards and standards bodies including the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C).
  13. Summarize Web standards in terms of specifications, guidelines, software, and tools.
  14. Use technology and information resources to research issues in Web design and development.
  15. Write clearly and concisely about Web design and development using proper writing mechanics and technical style conventions.
Course Guide
CIS 276 SQL Programming

This course covers the concept, design and components of querying databases using the Structured Query Language ( SQL ). Involves the creation of tables, constraints, use of DML, use of DDL, and defining transactions.

  1. Write PL/SQL code to demonstrate competence of the basic concepts in the Oracle architecture and its implementation with SQL.
  2. Load the Oracle Server.
  3. Create relational databases and demonstrate this by creating Tablespaces, Tables and other objects.
  4. Perform basic administration of the Oracle Server.
  5. Code Basic SQL statements and demonstrate this knowledge by coding applications.
  6. Code SQL statements that restrict and sort data and demonstrate this knowledge by coding applications.
  7. Write SQL code to employ Oracle functions and demonstrate this knowledge by coding applications.
  8. Write SQL code to employ Join Statements that display data from Multiple Tables and demonstrate this knowledge by coding applications.
  9. Write SQL code to use of Sub-queries and demonstrate this knowledge by coding applications.
  10. Write SQL code to produce Reports and demonstrate this knowledge by coding applications.
  11. Create and manage Tables, Tablespaces, and Database objects and demonstrate this knowledge by coding applications.
  12. Create Constraints, Sequences, Indexes, Views and Synonyms and demonstrate this knowledge by coding applications.
  13. Create users and manage access to the Oracle Database and demonstrate this knowledge by coding applications.
  14. Synthesize current information related to topics in this course using the APA format.
Course Guide
CIS 309 Web Page Development II

This course provides advanced techniques to design, develop, and test web-based applications. Topics include using static and dynamic scripting languages to create interactive web sites, manipulating strings, objects and data in arrays, and working with client/server databases. Students will use object-oriented programming techniques as well as using authentication and security in creating the Web sites.

Course Guide
CIS 324 Computer Ethics

This course provides critical ethical and legal information that computer security professionals must take into account when developing security policies, plans, and procedures. This course focuses on ethical and legal issues and privacy considerations that organizations must take into account. Topics also include issues related to risk mitigation and analysis, incident response and contingency planning.

Course Guide
CIS 328 C++ Programming II

This course covers advanced topics in the C++ object-oriented programming language. Students will test, document and design business-oriented programs and solve advanced programming problems. Topics include data structures, recursion, design patterns, memory management and exception handling.

  1. Review, discuss and apply the method of recursion.
  2. Compare and contrast recursive with iterative programming problem solving approaches.
  3. Compare selection sort and merge sort algorithms.
  4. Discuss the use and significance of linked lists.
  5. Differentiate among list, queues and stack data types.
  6. Understand the different types of operators.
  7. Demonstrate the ability to implement overloaded operators in classes.
  8. Design and use constructors and destructors.
  9. Discuss how the memory management system operates.
  10. Design and define template classes and functions
  11. Design approaches that manage exception handling conditions.
  12. Discuss the use of name management techniques and mechanisms in C++.
  13. Demonstrate the ability to group classes into a class hierarchy.
  14. Demonstrate the ability to use the Standard Template Library (STL).
  15. Demonstrate an understanding of object-oriented design as part of the software lifecycle.
  16. Demonstrate the ability to use graphic notations to address solve a business problem using the Unified Modeling Language.
  17. Compare and contrast common design patterns.
  18. Research issues in forthcoming revisions of the C++ programming language.
  19. Use technology and information resources to research issues in advanced C++ Programming.
  20. Write clearly and concisely about advanced C++ Programming topics using proper writing mechanics and technical style conventions.
Course Guide
CIS 329 Administering Desktop Clients

Provides students with the knowledge and skills necessary to perform administration tasks in a peer to peer network or server centric network. Administration topics include installation, configuration, user management, resource management, and security.

  1. Identify computing conditions in which a system needs to be reconfigured.
  2. Demonstrate the ability to install and configure an operating system and its associated updates.
  3. Validate and successfully install a computer operating system.
  4. Demonstrate the ability to discuss the migration phases and considerations in an operating system installation.
  5. Prepare an enterprise environment for systems deployment using image files.
  6. Configure and define the disks and devices in an operating system environment.
  7. Demonstrate the ability to configure networking settings in an operating systems environment.
  8. Compare and contrast among different layers of networking stack as it relates to operating systems.
  9. Demonstrate the ability to apply technology tools to monitor and configure network performance.
  10. Demonstrate the ability to set and configure resource permissions.
  11. Demonstrate the ability to describe and configure secure computing applications.
  12. Analyze computer performance and performance statistics.
  13. Describe the properties of user accounts and configure its components.
  14. Demonstrate authentication and authorization in configuring secure user accounts.
  15. Demonstrate operating system troubleshooting techniques.
  16. Demonstrate the ability to understand operating system administration activities.
  17. Develop a deployment and troubleshooting plan for an operating system environment.
  18. Discuss and configure mobile computing options.
  19. Use technology and information resources to research issues in desktop administration and operating system environments.
  20. Write clearly and concisely about desktop administration and operating system environments using proper writing mechanics and technical style conventions.
Course Guide
CIS 332 Network Server Administration I

Provides students with the knowledge and skills needed to perform central administration tasks on the server(s) in a server-centric network. Topics covered by this course include installing / configuring servers, network protocols, resource and user management, security, Active Directory, and the variety of possible server roles to be implemented.

  1. Explain the various types of servers and services required within organizations.
  2. Describe the need for hardware and software integration.
  3. Demonstrate the ability to prepare, maintain, and update a computer system for use as a server.
  4. Demonstrate the ability to configure routing, file, and print services.
  5. Demonstrate the ability to design and implement a multi-server computer network and deliver services on that network.
  6. Analyze server performance and performance statistics.
  7. Demonstrate the ability to design a multi-master environment for a given situation.
  8. Describe and configure secure network and computing applications.
  9. Describe the major problems associated with current data storage practice.
  10. Develop a server migration plan to address and solve a proposed business problem.
  11. Use technology and information resources to research issues in server administration.
  12. Write clearly and concisely about server administration topics using proper writing mechanics and technical style conventions.
Course Guide
CIS 333 Networking Security Fundamentals

This course provides an overview of information technology security principles, challenges, vulnerabilities and countermeasure strategies. Topics include definition of security terms, concepts, elements, and goals. Students will explore industry standards and practices that focus on the availability, integrity and confidentiality aspects of information systems security.

  1. Explain the concepts of information systems security as applied to an IT infrastructure.
  2. Describe the principles of risk management, common response techniques, and issues related to recovery of IT systems.
  3. Describe how malicious attacks, threats, and vulnerabilities impact an IT infrastructure.
  4. Explain the means attackers use to compromise systems and networks, and defenses used by organizations.
  5. Explain the role of access controls in implementing a security policy.
  6. Explain the role of operations and administration in effective implementation of a security policy.
  7. Describe the ethical principles and standards in information security.
  8. Explain the importance of security audits, testing, and monitoring to effective security policy implementation.
  9. Explain how businesses apply cryptography in maintaining information security.
  10. Analyze the importance of network principles and architecture to security operations.
  11. Apply international and domestic information security standards and compliance laws to real-world implementation in both the private and public sector.
  12. Use technology and information resources to research issues in information systems security.
  13. Write clearly and concisely about network security topics using proper writing mechanics and technical style conventions.
Course Guide
CIS 337 Internetworking Basics

This course introduces students to the OSI model and LAN concepts. Topics include networking devices that operate at Physical, Data Link, and the Network layers of the OSI model, LAN and internetworking cabling requirements, IP addressing and subnetting, collision and broadcast domains, LANs, WANs, and TCP / IP. Also included are labs to demonstrate router startup, router setup, configuring router interfaces, and the basics of network management.

  1. Summarize the basic components and media of network systems and distinguish between LANs, MANs, and WANs.
  2. Describe and differentiate the different layers of the Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) and TCP / IP protocol stack.
  3. Compare, contrast, create, and assign IP addresses to Class A, B, C, D, and E networks.
  4. Describe the TCP / IP protocols and various functions among the application layer.
  5. Configure and troubleshoot router and switches the Internetwork Operating System (Cisco IOS) using the Console Command Line Interface (CLI).
  6. Describe the difference between connection-oriented and connection-less protocols.
  7. Demonstrate the use of operating system commands to monitor, control, and configure Internetworking environments.
  8. Describe and implement VLANs on a computing network.
  9. Compare and contrast dynamic routing, distance vector routing, and link-state routing protocols.
  10. Describe organizational security considerations in an Internetworking environment.
  11. Use technology and information resources to research issues in Internetworking.
  12. Write clearly and concisely about basic internetworking using proper writing mechanics and technical style conventions.
Course Guide
CIS 348 Information Technology Project Management

This course examines the processes, methods, techniques and tools that organizations use to manage their information technology projects in accordance with the Project Management Institutes Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK®). Emphasis is placed on the methodology and project management software for initiating, planning, executing, controlling, and closing technology projects. Topics include various types of technologies to support group collaboration and the use of resources from within the firm as well as contracted from outside the organization.

Course Guide
CIS 356 Decision Support and Business Intelligence

This course covers the techniques, frameworks, and application of computerized decision support systems that support managerial decision making. Topics include the characteristics, structure, uses, and types of decision support systems.

  1. Describe decision support systems (DSS) in the context of managerial decision making.
  2. Use data-mining visualization and heuristic options in discovery and decision support processes.
  3. Describe the ethical issues in DSS data in organizational settings.
  4. Describe DSS software packages and their application into organizational practice.
  5. Explain the application of business analytics and data mining in Business Intelligence (BI).
  6. Compare and contrast DSS modeling techniques and analysis.
  7. Describe the application of neural networks in organizational settings.
  8. Explain the role of text mining and Web mining as they relate to BI and DSS.
  9. Describe the role of data warehouses in the context of DSS.
  10. Compare and contrast business performance management, planning, and measurement techniques.
  11. Describe collaborative and group support systems (GSS) and tools in the context of managerial decision making.
  12. Describe the role of knowledge management in organizational activities.
  13. Compare and contrast the foundations, definitions, and application of artificial intelligence and expert systems.
  14. Describe the application of advanced intelligent systems to include genetic algorithms, fuzzy logic, and case-based reasoning.
  15. Analyze and critique emerging trends of management support systems.
  16. Describe methods of data mining and what insights may be gained by these methods.
  17. Describe the application of data mining to information, data, and databases.
  18. Develop a decision support solution to solve a proposed business problem.
  19. Use technology and information resources to research issues in data mining.
  20. Write clearly and concisely about Decision Support and Business Intelligence topics using proper writing mechanics and technical style conventions.
Course Guide
CIS 375 Human Computer Interaction

This course presents students with user-centered methodologies in the development, evaluation, and deployment of information technology applications and systems. Students are exposed to evolving technologies and devices, and how to design interactive products that enhance the way people communicate, interact, and work with computers. Topics include human-computer interaction, user and task analysis, human factors, ergonomics, accessibility standards, and cognitive psychology.

  1. Describe the relationship between the cognitive principles and their application to interfaces and products.
  2. Explain the conceptual terms for analyzing human interaction with affordance, conceptual models, and feedback.
  3. Construct evaluation techniques to the user experience and system usability in the design process.
  4. Explain the importance of user abilities and characteristics in the usability of products.
  5. Compare and contrast the different types of interactive environments.
  6. Describe the differences in developing user interfaces for different application environments.
  7. Compare and contrast the various cognitive models.
  8. List the general principles used in the heuristic evaluation of a user interface design.
  9. Create a simple usability evaluation for an existing software application or product.
  10. Describe common usability guidelines and standards.
  11. Define the different types of interaction styles.
  12. Demonstrate the ability to select an appropriate user interface interaction style for a particular task.
  13. Explain the characteristics of human-centered design methods.
  14. Create a product evaluation through a formal framework.
  15. Describe, in scenario form, a problem situation to be addressed by a new or redesigned product.
  16. Evaluate the ethical concerns inherent in human-computer interaction and how these concerns affect organizational policies.
  17. Explain the different usability data-gathering techniques.
  18. Use technology and information resources to research issues in human-computer interaction.
  19. Write clearly and concisely about human-computer interaction topics using proper writing mechanics and technical style conventions.
Course Guide
CIS 401 Network Server Administration II

This is a lab-based course that prepares students with advanced server administration concepts to plan, deploy, secure, monitor, backup, and manage enterprise network server environments. Topics also include storage solutions, high availability, file and printer services, and security.

  1. Explain and plan server deployments.
  2. Describe and plan the implementation of infrastructure services.
  3. Design and plan for the deployment of Active Directory.
  4. Compare and contrast deployment strategies among different application servers.
  5. Compare and contrast among different types of high availability solutions.
  6. Design and plan the implementation of application and file and print services.
  7. Design and plan the implementation of storage solutions and high availability.
  8. Demonstrate the ability to develop server and network security designs for a large enterprise.
  9. Demonstrate the ability to develop strategies that manage, monitor, and backup enterprise server environments.
  10. Develop a migration plan to address and solve a proposed business problem.
  11. Use technology and information resources to research issues in the administration of server environments.
  12. Write clearly and concisely about advanced network server implementation topics using proper writing mechanics and technical style conventions.
Course Guide
CIS 406 JAVA Programming I

This course introduces students to the fundamental constructs of the Java object-oriented programming language. Students will test, document, and design business-oriented programs. Topics include objects, classes, iteration, encapsulation, polymorphism, and inheritance.

  1. Demonstrate the proper use and application of syntax in the Java programming language.
  2. Demonstrate the ability to design, compile, implement, test, and debug simple programs in Java.
  3. Compare and contrast classes and objects in Java.
  4. Construct classes through systematic procedures.
  5. Demonstrate the ability to manipulate numbers and character strings in Java.
  6. Demonstrate the ability to program simple and complex decisions in Java.
  7. Discuss the concepts of inheritance and polymorphism.
  8. Discuss exception handling and basic file input / output.  
  9. Describe and implement iteration in Java.
  10. Compare and contrast arrays and array lists in Java.
  11. Differentiate between static methods and variables.
  12. Declare and use interface types.
  13. Discuss object-oriented design principles.
  14. Use technology and information resources to research issues in Java programming.
  15. Write clearly and concisely about Java programming using proper writing mechanics and technical style conventions.
Course Guide
CIS 407 JAVA Programming II

This course covers advanced topics in the Java object-oriented programming language. Students will test, document, and design business-oriented programs and solve advanced programming problems. Topics include advanced data structures, recursion, multithreading, and the application of Java constructs to the Internet and database development.

  1. Review and discuss the method of recursion.
  2. Compare selection sort and merge sort algorithms.
  3. Discuss the use and significance of linked lists.
  4. Compare and contrast abstract and concrete data types.
  5. Differentiate between stack and queue data types.
  6. Describe hashing functions.
  7. Describe and demonstrate the use of binary search trees, priority queues, and heaps.
  8. Demonstrate the ability to implement generic classes and methods.
  9. Design programs that handle events from user-interface components.
  10. Create Java programs that interact with disk files and related sources of bytes and characters.
  11. Describe and apply multithreading behavior.
  12. Design programs that communicate with Web servers and server-side applications through the Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP).
  13. Design Java programs that use the Structured Query Language to query and update relational databases.
  14. Describe the syntax, purpose, and use of the Extensible Markup Language (XML) in the context of Java.
  15. Describe the Java Server faces framework and use in Web applications.
  16. Use technology and information resources to research issues in Java programing.
  17. Write clearly and concisely about Java programing using proper writing mechanics and technical style conventions.
Course Guide
CIS 409 Directory Services Infrastructure

This is a lab-based course that prepares students to install, configure, secure and maintain services in the Windows Active Directory environment. Topics include group policies, directory configuration, security strategies, and certificate services.

  1. Describe Active Directory Domain Services.
  2. Demonstrate the ability to describe, configure, and administer Active Directory services.
  3. Demonstrate the ability to implement and manage Active Directory Sites.
  4. Describe the Global Catalog and Flexible Single Master Operations Roles.
  5. Create security plans for use in the Active Directory environment.
  6.  Demonstrate the ability to describe, configure, and administer Group Policy in the Active Directory environment.
  7. Create and configure User and Computer environments using Group Policy in the Active Directory environment.
  8. Demonstrate the ability to perform software installations using Group Policy.
  9. Demonstrate the ability to plan an implementation based on a Group Policy Management.
  10. Describe and plan for Active Directory maintenance, troubleshooting, and disaster recovery activities.
  11. Use technology and information resources to research issues in directory service infrastructure environments.
  12. Write clearly and concisely about directory service infrastructure topics using proper writing mechanics and technical style conventions.
Course Guide
CIS 411 Advanced Routing

This course provides the student with the knowledge necessary to implement, monitor, and maintain advanced network routing services. This includes the capability to plan, configure, and verify the performance and implementation of LAN and WAN routing solutions.

  1. Describe advanced IP addressing to include classless inter-domain routing (CIDR), IP Version 6 (IPv6), and Network Address Translation (NAT) with route maps.
  2. Identify advanced IP routing commands and principles, including static and dynamic routing characteristics and the concepts of classless routing and network boundary summarization.
  3. Analyze and configure Enhanced Interior Gateway Routing Protocol (EIGRP) and Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) for a scalable network.
  4. Apply routing updates and packet flow using redistribution, distribution lists, administrative distance, route maps, and policy-based routing.
  5. Utilize routing commands based on the CISCO IOS.
  6. Configure basic Border Gateway Protocol (BGP) for internal and external connections to include path selection process, default behavior of BGP, and multi-homing.
  7. Describe and develop implementation solutions for remote enterprise environments.
  8. Describe the implementation process of IPv6 in an enterprise network.
  9. Describe security design considerations in routing context for a distributed, mobile, and branch office workforce.
  10. Explain and develop secure routing strategies based on the Cisco model.
  11. Use technology and information resources to research issues in advanced routing.
  12. Write clearly and concisely about advanced routing using proper writing mechanics.
Course Guide
CIS 413 Internetworking Switching

This course provides the student with the essential information to implement, monitor, and maintain switching in converged enterprise campus networks. The course includes the secure integration of VLANs, WLANs, and voice and video solutions onto campus networks.

  1. Explain the various switches and campus design within the various OSI layers.
  2. Summarize campus switched network constructions, support, and security.
  3. Explain the fundamentals of multilayer switched network design.
  4. Configure and implement VLANs in a Campus network environment.
  5. Describe and configure spanning tree.
  6. Analyze and configure and implement Inter-VLAN routing.
  7. Describe and implement high availability in a campus infrastructure.
  8. Describe wireless client access and configure switches to support voice technologies.
  9. Understand and implement a secure campus switching environment.
  10. Use technology and information resources to research issues in internetworking switching.
  11. Write clearly and concisely about internetworking switching using proper writing mechanics.
Course Guide
CIS 417 Computer Forensics

This course offers an introduction to system forensics investigation and response. Topics include procedures for investigating computer and cybercrime, tools, techniques, and methods used to perform forensic investigations and concepts for collecting, analyzing, recovering, and preserving forensic evidence.

  1. Identify the role of computer forensics in responding to crimes and solving business challenges.
  2. Outline system forensics issues, laws, and skills.
  3. Describe the purpose and structure of a digital forensics lab.
  4. Examine and explain the evidence life cycle
  5. Identify the procurement of evidence in physical and virtualized environments.
  6. Analyze the impact of sequestration on the evidence-gathering process.
  7. Develop plans that collect evidence in network and email environments.
  8. Examine automated digital forensic analysis.
  9. Report investigative findings of potential evidentiary value.
  10. Describe the constraints on digital forensic investigations.
  11. Evaluate the ethical concerns that computer forensics issues raise in a global context.  
  12. Develop a computer forensics deployment plan that addresses and solves a proposed business problem.
  13. Use technology and information resources to research issues in computer forensics.
  14. Write clearly and concisely about computer forensics topics using proper writing mechanics and technical style conventions.
Course Guide
CIS 429 Data Warehouse Planning

This course covers the principles, approaches, and critical issues in planning, designing, and deploying data warehouses. Topics include data extraction, data cleansing, data transformation, architecture, and infrastructure. Students will examine recent trends in data warehousing, metadata, and architectural components.

  1. Explain the significance of a data warehouse and its basic structure.
  2. Analyze the evolution, ethical issues, and future trends in data warehousing.
  3. Describe the significance, use, and types of meta-data and meta-modeling.
  4. Compare and contrast online transaction processing (OLTP) with online analytic processing (OLAP).
  5. Describe the relationship between business intelligence, data warehousing, and data mining.
  6. Explain how the data warehouse concept relates to enterprise information integration.
  7. Use graphic software to Illustrate and apply the use of dimensional modeling to address and solve a proposed business problem.
  8. Describe the use of dimensional modeling in an organizational context.
  9. Explain the concept of data integration and its use in the creation of data warehouses and data marts.
  10. Analyze and apply planning techniques in the use of extraction, transformation, and loading.
  11. Compare the features and functions of OLAP models.
  12. Develop a data warehousing solution to solve a proposed business problem.
  13. Use technology and information resources to research issues in data warehousing.
  14. Write clearly and concisely about topics related to data warehouse planning using proper writing mechanics and technical style conventions.
Course Guide
CIS 462 Security Strategy and Policy

The course presents a discussion on security policies created to protect and maintain a computing network, such as password policy, e-mail policy and Internet policy. Students are presented with a comprehensive view of information security policies, frameworks and issues related to organizational behavior and crisis management. Topics also include governance, regulation, mandates, business drivers and legal considerations when implementing security policies and frameworks.

  1. Identify the role of an information systems security (ISS) policy framework in overcoming business challenges.
  2. Analyze how security policies help mitigate risks and support business processes in various domains in the information technology (IT) infrastructure.
  3. Summarize the ethical components and basic requirements for creating a security policy framework.
  4. Compare and contrast the different methods, roles, responsibilities, and accountabilities of personnel, along with the governance and compliance of security policy framework.
  5. Describe the different ISS policies associated with the user domain.
  6. Analyze the different ISS policies associated with the IT infrastructure.
  7. Describe the different ISS policies associated with risk management.
  8. Compare and contrast the different ISS policies associated with incident response teams (IRT).
  9. Describe different issues related to implementing and enforcing ISS policies.
  10. Describe the different issues related to defining, tracking, monitoring, reporting, automating, and configuration of compliance systems and emerging technologies.
  11. Design a security policy framework.
  12. Use technology and information resources to research issues in security strategy and policy formation.
  13. Write clearly and concisely about Information Systems Security Policy topics using proper writing mechanics and technical style conventions.
Course Guide

Criminal Justice

CRJ 100 Introduction to Criminal Justice
CRJ 105 Crime and Criminal Behavior

This course covers the historical development of social and behavior explanations of adult crime, as well as juvenile crime and new evolutions in crime, including cyber crimes. Crime causation theories are explained in relation to policies developed from these theories, and the real and intended impact of these policies are discussed to demonstrate their impact on society concerning crime prevention and criminal rehabilitation.

  1. Describe the nature of crime and criminology.
  2. Explore the nature and prosecution of global crime.
  3. Analyze the assumptions, limitations, and sample policies for the major theories of criminology.
  4. Compare and contrast the major theories of criminology.
  5. Identify the major theories of criminology that explain the differences between adult and juvenile crime.
  6. Describe major types of crime.
  7. Discuss new evolutions in theory to explain current evolutions in crime, such as cybercrime.
  8. Use technology and information resources to research issues in crime and criminal behavior.
  9. Write clearly and concisely about crime and criminal behavior using proper writing mechanics.
Course Guide
CRJ 180 Juvenile Delinquency and Justice

This course examines the criminal activity of juveniles and includes the study of gangs, status offenses, and the problems facing juveniles today. An overview of American juvenile justice is also provided, in terms of both system and practice. The causes of juvenile crime, the juvenile court system, and the institutionalization, rehabilitation, and treatment of juveniles are explored.

  1. Describe what it means to be an adolescent in American society today.
  2. Explain how delinquents have been handled throughout history.
  3. Differentiate between various theoretical explanations for delinquent behavior.
  4. Illustrate how social factors such as gender, racial and ethnic background, and social class relate to delinquency.
  5. Apply theories of gang formation to the development of youthful offenders.
  6. Explore the relationship of illicit drugs, gangs, and forms of delinquency.
  7. Explicate the types of prevention programs that are likely to work with high-risk youngsters.
  8. Identify successful evidence-based treatment modalities for juvenile delinquents and be able to describe the ingredients of effective programs.
  9. Identify the interaction among the various stages of the juvenile justice process.
  10. Contrast the differences between the juvenile and adult justice system in the United States.
Course Guide
CRJ 310 Law Enforcement Operations and Management
CRJ 320 Criminal Investigation

The course introduces students to the fundamentals of criminal investigation by examining processes involved in identifying and arresting criminal suspects, identifying types of crimes and offenses, and in preparing for the in-court presentation of evidence through testimony. Techniques and procedures for evidence collection, preservation, and examination are discussed, and developing “high technologies” useful to the criminal investigator are explored.

  1. Describe the major components of and responsiblities involved in the investigative process.
  2. Recommend improvements to the criminal investigation process in selected areas.
  3. Describe the procedures for the preparation of field notes and the documentation of a crime scene.
  4. Evaluate the importance of search and seizure, processing the crime scene and collecting evidence, the criminal intelligence function, and the use of information resources in the investigative process.
  5. Analyze the process of undercover and surveillance operations.
  6. Analyze the procedures involved in making an arrest, conducting interviews and interrogations, and the importance of the accurate identification of suspects.
  7. Recommend effective ways to apply the investigative process to violent crimes.
  8. Describe effective ways to apply the investigative process to property crimes and financial crimes.
  9. Describe effective ways to apply the investigative process to drug offenses, organized crime, and other dangerous groups.
  10. Explore the nature and investigative processes of investigating terrorism.
  11. Predict changes that will take place in criminal investigation in the next 20 years.
  12. Describe effective ways to apply the investigative process to cybercrime.
  13. Evaluate the role of the criminal investigator in preparing evidence for presentation and courtroom testimony.
  14. Use technology and information resources to conduct research in the criminal investigation process.
  15. Write clearly and concisely about the criminal investigation process using proper writing mechanics.
Course Guide
CRJ 330 Comparative Criminal Justice

This course offers a comparative perspective on crime and on the practice of criminal justice. The role of increased globalization in transnational crime and justice are explored, to include: trafficking in persons, transnational crime, narcoterrorism, international cybercrime and cyberscams, the relationships between international terrorist organizations, and the functioning and organization of international crime fighting agencies.

  1. Describe the nature of globalization and assess the aims and methods of comparative criminal justice and criminology.
  2. Illustrate the nature and extent of various types of transnational crime.
  3. Compare and contrast American perspectives on criminal law with those of other countries.
  4. Understand the principles of the four major legal traditions and types of legal systems around the world.
  5. Appraise the role of procedural law in the four major legal traditions.
  6. Appraise the nature of comparative policing and global law enforcement cooperation.
  7. Differentiate the role of courts in various societies and in international context.
  8. Compare international perspectives on corrections and criminal punishment, including comparative sentencing typologies.
  9. Compare various international perspectives on juvenile justice.
  10. Use technology and information resources to research comparative perspectives of criminal justice.
Course Guide
CRJ 410 Corrections

This course provides a comprehensive overview of the field of corrections. It explores agencies, practices, and polices relevant to prisons, jails, and probation and parole. Students examine both historic and contemporary punishment policies in the United States, sentencing structures; socio-political economic conditions that influence disparate sentencing and confinement; facility designs and how they correlate with inmate management philosophies; the legal aspects of the care, custody and control of inmates; the constitutional rights and civil liberties of inmates; security operations, and inmate treatment services.

  1. Describe the U.S. Constitutional amendments that apply to correctional management and operations.
  2. Recommend improvements to selected areas of corrections.
  3. Explain the purposes of corrections.
  4. Describe the reform of American criminal justice beginning with 15th century Europe.
  5. Analyze various issues in corrections, including effective community corrections programs, probation and parole, and reentry strategies.
  6. Analyze the operational components of prisons, jails, and alternative correctional placements.
  7. Propose specific components of an institutional facility model based on effective management policies and procedures for a specified group of inmates.
  8. Analyze key issues involved with the correctional staff.
  9. Classify inmate types, explaining the issues involved and the purposes served within prison society by various types.
  10. Analyze gender issues involved in corrections.
  11. Examine the administration of correctional institutions and programs that involve the rights of inmates and those convicted of crimes.
  12. Analyze important issues facing the correctional enterprise today, including privatization, special needs populations, and disparities pertaining to race, religion, and economics.
  13. Analyze the history of and key issues involving the death penalty.
  14. Explain how juvenile corrections differ from adult corrections.
  15. Analyze key issues pertinent to victims of crime.
  16. Use technology and information resources to research correctional facility policies.
  17. Write clearly and concisely about correctional facility policies using proper writing mechanics.
Course Guide
CRJ 420 Emergency Management Procedures

This course provides an in-depth review of the concepts of emergency management work. The operational aspects are discussed in relation to the skills needed to do emergency management work, as well as the analytical and critical thinking skills needed for incident command work. Emphasis is placed on the use of technologies, enhanced leadership skills, and the challenges of communications in disaster work.

  1. Describe the historical context and role of emergency management in disaster response.
  2. Assess how emergency management personnel respond to the major forms of natural, technological, and man-made disasters.
  3. Determine how the major forms of emergency management work: mitigation, response, recovery, preparedness, and communications, are interrelated.
  4. Analyze the difficulties of emergency response and propose strategies for overcoming obstacles.
  5. Assess international disaster management and preparation for terrorist threats.
  6. Predict and explore future trends and challenges in emergency management.
  7. Use technology and information resources to research issues in emergency management.
Course Guide
PSY 100 Psychology of Adjustment
PSY 105 Introduction to Psychology
PSY 110 Social Psychology

Focuses on major theories in social psychology and the most recent research in the field. Topics include gender, interpersonal attraction, aggression, and prosocial behavior.

  1. Describe the major theories within the field of social psychology.
  2. Develop an increased understanding of the dynamic between society and individuals.
  3. Describe research methods that are used for studying social psychology.
  4. Apply concepts of social psychology to personal and professional situations.
  5. Use technology and information resources to research issues in social psychology.
  6. Write clearly and concisely about social psychology using proper grammar and mechanics.
Course Guide
PSY 205 Life Span Development

Economics

ECO 101 Microeconomics
ECO 102 Macroeconomics
ECO 302 Intermediate Macroeconomics

Covers systematic study of the theory of aggregate economics including the level and growth of national income and employment, the degree of utilization of productive capacity, and the general level of prices.

  1. Explain the concept, development, and importance of the Gross Domestic Product (GDP), including the relationship of expenditures, income, and production.
  2. Explain the development and use of economic models, including the concepts of endogenous and exogenous variables.
  3. Apply the principles of economic growth, the production function, real GDP, poverty, and income inequality to the historical and current world economic situations.
  4. Apply the principles of the Solow Growth Model, including the effects of changes in consumption, technology, labor input, and the population growth rate, convergence, and long-term economic growth.
  5. Apply the concepts of markets, prices, supply, and demand to historical and current economic variables.
  6. Apply the concepts of consumption, savings, investment, and equilibrium.
  7. Evaluate impact of the equilibrium business cycle and the cyclical nature of real GDP on personal financial planning.
  8. Relate the concepts of capital utilization and unemployment theory to the historical and contemporary economic environment.
  9. Apply concepts of money supply, how the money supply is measured, money supply growth, inflation, interest rates, and cyclical changes in the money supply to economic growth and equilibrium.
  10. Explain how government expenditures, including transfer payments and government purchases, affect the economy and economic growth.
  11. Apply the principles of taxation, public debt, and social security to the economy and household budgets.
  12. Demonstrate how the equilibrium business-cycle model, sticky prices, and nominal wage rates are reflected in current economic events.
  13. Explain and apply the principles of international markets, balance of trade, and foreign exchange rates to the current economic environment.
  14. Use technology and information resources to research issues in macroeconomics.
Course Guide
ECO 305 International Economics

Provides a comprehensive account of the theory and practice of international trade and international monetary relations. Emphasizes modern trade theory and applications, trade policies and arrangements, and international factor movements. Covers topics in international financial relations, including the balance of payments, exchange rate determination and regimes, international economic policy, and international banking.

  1. Explain the concept of comparative advantage and the principle theories of why trade occurs.
  2. Analyze the sources of comparative advantage in national economies and the international movement of productive factors to identify business opportunities/threats.
  3. Explain the economic effect of tariffs, nontariff barriers, and various forms of trade policies adopted by national governments.
  4. Analyze the impact of the different forms of regional trading arrangements on international trade, and the role of the major international trade and financial institutions in fostering trade.
  5. Identify and describe of the major economic issues affecting the strategic management of multinational firms.
  6. Outline how exchange rates are determined, the types of exchange-rate mechanisms, and the role of foreign-exchange markets.
  7. Explain the balance of payments system and factors causing adjustments in the accounts.
  8. Use technology and information resources to research issues in international economics.
  9. Write clearly and concisely about international economics using proper writing mechanics.
Course Guide
ECO 320 Money and Banking
ECO 405 Economic Problems and Issues

Applies conventional economic theory to national and international economic issues and events. Utilizes the policy ideas and stances of contemporary economists to provoke discussion of prevailing economic issues. Applies economic tools to the business decision-making process.

  1. Analyze the economic impact of major social problems and issues such as poverty, discrimination, crime, income distribution, the role of government, and other major issues.
  2. Assess how the economic behavior of individuals, businesses, and governments can affect economic growth, social well-being, and the quality of life.
  3. Use economic analysis to describe the social costs and benefits of government and public policy choices.
  4. Analyze the relationship between economic activity and the resources available in a society.
  5. Appraise the role of large firms in terms of economic performance and social impact.
  6. Assess the major economic and related social issues associated with production, resource markets, and international trade.
  7. Use technology and information resources to research economic problems and issues.
  8. Write clearly and concisely about economic problems and issues using proper writing mechanics.
Course Guide
ECO 410 International Environment of Financial Management

Analyzes the world's financial markets and institutions and the international monetary system. Examines the considerations for financial global operations including sources of capital, interest rate analysis, tax considerations, trade finance, and working capital. Evaluates the financial risks associated with transaction, operating, and translation exposure in global markets. Reviews exchange rate determination, inflation, and interest rate changes.

  1. Assess the elements that make up the global financial environment.
  2. Explain foreign exchange theory and markets.
  3. Analyze foreign exchange exposure.
  4. Analyze financing the global firm.
  5. Discuss the key tasks involved in managing multinational operations.
  6. Analyze international investment decisions.
  7. Use technology and information resources to research issues in the international environment of financial management.
  8. Write clearly and concisely about international environment factors in financial management using proper writing mechanics.
Course Guide
ECO 450 Public Finance

This course covers economics of the public sector and analytical framework for government involvement, official budgeting process, cost-benefit analysis, taxes and their economic impact, national debt, fiscal policy, negative income tax, and other current topics.

  1. Examine the unique nature, functions, and role of public financial management.
  2. Assess the impact of budget deficits / surpluses and national debt on public finance, and strategies for managing these issues.
  3. Analyze current problems of social security and welfare systems, and formulate alternatives for changes in managing these systems.
  4. Analyze the economic impact of the tax system in the U.S.
  5. Apply the major concepts used in public finance to evaluate finance issues, isolate the core factors, and develop alternatives to address the issues.
  6. Develop financing alternatives for various types of government expenditures.
  7. Use technology and information resources to research issues in public finance.
  8. Write clearly and concisely about public finance using proper writing mechanics.
Course Guide

Health Services Administration

HSA 300 Health Services Organization Management

This course provides an overview of the various aspects of health care organizations. Specific areas covered include the transition and development of the industry, organizational design, oversight and management roles and responsibilities of various types of health care institutions and professionals, evaluating the purpose and clinical performance of physicians, nurses, clinical support and community health services, and the organization’s functions of financial and human resource management, information services, customer services, and marketing and strategy.

  1. Describe the major components of the U.S. healthcare system.
  2. Examine the political, economic, and social forces that have influenced the organizational foundations of the United States healthcare system.
  3. Explain how public policy has shaped the development of the U.S. healthcare system.
  4. Analyze major healthcare organizational leadership roles and functions.
  5. Examine how health care management concepts and theories are applied to critical issues in health care organizations.
  6. Analyze the critical management issues, purpose, functions, and performance measures of different departments within healthcare organizations.
  7. Use technology and information resources to research issues in health services organization management.
  8. Write clearly and concisely about health services organization management using proper writing mechanics.
Course Guide
HSA 305 Health Services Marketing

This course provides an overview of marketing in health care organizations. Specific areas covered include the role of marketing in health care organizations, the marketing environment in the health care industry, strategy and market planning, the use of market information systems and market research, market segmentation, shaping product and service offerings, pricing strategies and decisions, designing and managing marketing channels, designing and managing marketing communications, and implementing marketing.

  1. Describe the health care system and the role of marketing.
  2. Analyze the competitive environment of a health services organization and identify a course of action that will allow for strategic marketing success.  
  3. Analyze the users of the health care system.
  4. Describe the various tools of the marketing mix available to health care providers.
  5. Describe how health care providers can organize their marketing resources, implement their marketing plans, and use control tools to reach their stated goals.
  6. Use technology and information resources to research issues in health services marketing.
  7. Write clearly and concisely about health services marketing using proper writing mechanics.
Course Guide
HSA 315 Health Information Systems

This course provides an overview of current information systems including topics such as locating, collecting, analyzing, utilizing and reporting of health statistics to solve common workplace issues. Students will learn basic concepts of data quality and methods of presentation. Data systems issues as well as health indicators, metrics and measurements are covered to support informed decision making in a healthcare organization.

Course Guide
HSA 320 Healthcare Human Resource Management

This course introduces contemporary healthcare human resource management issues within the U.S. healthcare system. Contrasts the differences between personnel administration and elements of strategic human resource management. Students learn key concepts such as; line vs. staff relationships, the manager/employee relationship, job design, job analysis, position descriptions, recruitment, retention, promotion, succession planning, legal issues, safety issues, labor relations, training, compensation, benefits, and performance appraisals. Current trends in healthcare human resource management are covered.

  1. Appraise the aspects of managing human resources (HR) in healthcare organizations.
  2. Analyze the relationships between human resources, executive management, and other organizational departments.
  3. Evaluate laws and regulations affecting healthcare organizations.
  4. Analyze the factors affecting the employee / employer relationship in healthcare organizations.
  5. Analyze the elements of position descriptions, recruiting, and selection interviewing.
  6. Discuss the importance of training and development.
  7. Analyze the components of compensation, benefits, and performance management.
  8. Scrutinize the ethical and moral aspects of human resource guidelines and decisions.
  9. Apply the process of successful succession planning.
  10. Analyze the elements of labor and employee relations.
  11. Evaluate the process and advantages of arbitration.
  12. Describe the use of consultants and maintaining an effective human resources department.
  13. Use technology and information resources to research issues in healthcare human resources management.
  14. Write clearly and concisely about healthcare human resources management using proper writing mechanics.
Course Guide

Hospitality & Tourism Management

HTM 100 Principles of Hospitality and Tourism Management

Provides an overview of the hospitality industry, career opportunities, international perspective on the travel and tourism industry, and a comprehensive look at each department in the food service, lodging, and travel industries. Basic management theories will also be explored within the context of the industry.

  1. Discuss various career opportunities in the food service and lodging industries.
  2. Describe the significant trends impacting the hospitality industry.
  3. Categorize the different types of hotels.
  4. Differentiate the operations and functions of departments common to most hotels.
  5. Compare and contrast the general characteristics of quick service, mid-scale, upscale, and fine-dining restaurants
  6. Analyze the basic procedures involved in managing a restaurant operation.
  7. Determine the impact of computerization on food service and lodging operations, particularly in the areas of reservations, accounting, personnel management, and the recording of sales transactions.
  8. Analyze the interdependence of the food service, lodging, and meetings segments of the hospitality industry..
  9. Discuss the nature of and the various activities related to gaming entertainment.
  10. Demonstrate the role that customer-based quality service plays in the success of the hospitality enterprise.
  11. Determine the critical leadership skills needed for successful operations of companies in the hospitality industry.
  12. Use technology and information resources to research issues in hospitality and tourism management.
  13. Write clearly and concisely about hospitality and tourism management using proper writing mechanics.
Course Guide
HTM 150 Quality Service Assurance

This course focuses on the management of service quality and improvement within all operational segments of the hospitality and tourism industry. Topics contained in the course include introduction to quality management systems, managing teams, assessing an organization’s service strengths and weaknesses, servicing the customer, developing and implementing quality service, and management leadership. The course will prepare students to understand the importance of service quality and how to implement service quality plans within an organization.

  1. Develop a plan for managing and improving quality in a hospitality operation.
  2. Describe the management attributes contributing to providing service quality.
  3. List and describe basic service paradigms.
  4. Differentiate between high- and low-performance organizations and identify contributing factors.
  5. Develop team service performance models.
  6. Explain the typical service expectations of customers and the behaviors associated with providing these services.
  7. Define and apply the process of Total Quality Management to hospitality operations.
  8. Apply service quality standards used in other industries to the hospitality industry.
  9. Synthesize customer perceptions into service performance standards.
  10. Describe the leadership practices that can enhance employee service performance.
  11. Assess and implement quality standards as a “turnaround strategy.”
  12. Use technology and information resources to research issues in quality service assurance.
  13. Write clearly and concisely about quality service assurance using proper writing mechanics.
Course Guide
HTM 250 Purchasing and Cost Control

Introduces the student to the study of product selection, purchase, and storage of hospitality supplies. Students will learn to survey purveyors, write specifications, place orders, evaluate quality vs. cost, and keep purchasing financial records. This course also provides the student with a wide range of knowledge and specific solutions needed to keep costs low and margins high. Students will be able to apply technology to cost control and employ manager-developed Excel spreadsheets and Internet access. Content will examine uniform systems of accounts for restaurants, menu analysis, and cost / volume / profit analysis menu pricing and strategy.

  1. Explain how to analyze various procurement requirements to determine the optimal quantity, price, payment policy, and supplier.
  2. Explain the steps in the purchasing process.
  3. Write a specification for a food order.
  4. Demonstrate the ability to evaluate food costs and explain how this is used in the decision-making process.
  5. Develop a food cost budget.
  6. Explain the procedures for receiving goods.
  7. Explain the configuration of the basic financial statements used in restaurants and the management information the statements provide using ratio analysis.
  8. Explain how restaurant managers can use break-even analysis to assess costs, revenues, and profits.
  9. Use technology and information resources to research issues in purchasing and cost control.
  10. Write clearly and concisely about purchasing and cost control using proper writing mechanics.
Course Guide
HTM 280 Lodging Operations Management

Presents a detailed study of lodging management and front-office management systems by detailing the flow of operational procedures for the total hotel organization. The student will examine the various elements of effective front-office management, paying particular attention to the planning and evaluation of front-office operations, human resources management, and guest services. Course content will include interdepartmental communications, computer applications, managerial reporting, and a review of the current and future trends in technology. The student will be able to interpret statistical analyses in areas of price structure, occupancy patterns, and income. These analyses will serve as the bases for improving decision making, and for policy and procedure implementation.

  1. Describe the characteristics of the hotel industry, ownership patterns, and market dynamics.
  2. Develop an organizational chart detailing the relationship of hotel departments with the front-office and discuss responsibilities of each front-office position.
  3. Develop a strategy to forecast and manage customer reservations and set room rates that ensure a hotel’s profitability.
  4. Explain the function and operation of the various systems and automation applications that support hotel operations, including the property management systems, communications, room locking systems and security, and reservation systems.
  5. Design the guest services and processing of arrivals / rooming to improve the quality of hotel operations and enhance customer satisfaction.
  6. Develop procedures for handling guest complaints.
  7. Explain how to effectively manage the billing and guest folio process in a hotel.
  8. Establish night audit procedures to effectively managing hotel operations.
  9. Use technology and information resources to research issues in lodging operations management.
  10. Write clearly and concisely about issues in lodging operations management using proper writing mechanics.
Course Guide

International Business

ITB 300 Fundamentals of Global Management

Examines major theories of management and their implications for multinational and/or trans-national corporations. Provides an insight into the nature and scope of international management. Focuses on strategic planning, negotiations, managerial styles, and human resources in international organizations in the context of globalization.

  1. Describe the current trends in international business and highlight major regional trade characteristics.
  2. Explain the role of multinational corporations (MNCs) in international business.
  3. Analyze the major economic, social/cultural, technology, and political/legal aspects of the international business environment.
  4. Analyze the ethical issues in conducting international business and develop guidelines for a company to operate in an ethical and socially responsible manner in global markets.
  5. Analyze leadership styles and operating norms and their relationship to cultural differences, organizational cultures, and the motivation of employees in diverse work environments.
  6. Develop human resources management strategies to support international business organizations, including planning, staffing, training, compensation, and labor relations.
  7. Explain the major considerations for effective communication and decision making in an international environment.
  8. Formulate competitive market entry strategies and organizational structures to operate in foreign markets.
  9. Use technology and information resources to research issues in global management.
  10. Write clearly and concisely about global management using proper writing mechanics.
Course Guide
ITB 305 International Business Environment

Introduces the student to the international business environment. Examines strategic planning, multinational corporations, and management considerations for international business operations. Analyzes the major environmental factors affecting international transactions (political, economic, technical, and cultural factors). Reviews international trade theory, government influence on world trade patterns, and the international monetary system. Examines the range of market entry strategies and discusses payment methods and financing considerations.

  1. Assess the current trends and impact of globalization on labor, business operations, and government.  
  2. Analyze the major economic, cultural, and political / legal aspects of the international business environment, including the economic dynamics of foreign trade, regional and global trade integration, and key cultural dimensions.
  3. Apply the concepts of value creation / value chain and formulate competitive market entry strategies that leverage the advantages of international operations.
  4. Analyze the challenges and advantages of foreign direct investment.
  5. Appraise the strategies companies use to minimize risk in the foreign exchange markets.
  6. Critically evaluate the role of the IMF, the World Bank Group, and government policies in fostering trade and economic development.
  7. Formulate supporting financial management, operations / production, marketing, and human resource management strategies to conduct international operations.
  8. Analyze factors influencing acquisitions and alliances, the creation and dissolution of alliances, the challenges involved in acquisitions and alliances, and how to address them.
  9. Develop an organizational architecture to support international business operations.
  10. Develop an ethical framework for conducting international business and making ethical decisions.
  11. Use technology and information resources to research issues in international business environment.
  12. Write clearly and concisely about international business environment using proper writing mechanics.
Course Guide
ITB 400 International Banking and Finance

Introduces students to international banking, functions and responsibilities of the international loan officer, and the role that commercial and government financial institutions play in facilitating world trade. Subjects include balance of payments and country risk assessment, letters of credit, principles of foreign exchange, principles of international lending, national and international trade financing, the Eurodollar market, and national and international lending agencies.

  1. Analyze the current trends and impact of globalization on international financial management.
  2. Assess the basic functioning of the current arrangements of flexible exchange systems that dominate the international monetary system and explain the impact on business operations.
  3. Interpret the balance of payments accounts, and summarize key information to support financial planning and the strategic management of international business.
  4. Analyze the foreign exchange markets to anticipate fluctuations, minimize the negative impact on international business operations, and identify financing opportunities.
  5. Assess the risks of foreign currency exposures and develop strategies to manage these risks.
  6. Evaluate the basic functioning of the international banking system and financial markets (money, bond, equity) and the techniques for using the markets to finance global operations.
  7. Develop financial strategies to support long-term financing of global operations that address portfolio investment, capital budgeting, and foreign direct investment decisions.
  8. Analyze short-term requirements and develop financial management strategies to finance trade and global operations.
  9. Use technology and information resources to research issues in international banking and finance.
  10. Write clearly and concisely about international banking and finance using proper writing mechanics.
Course Guide

Legal Studies

LEG 100 Business Law I

Examines the legal environment of business, the sources of American law, and the basis of authority for government to regulate business. Provides a survey of tort law, contracts and the UCC, and the federal and state courts.


LEG 107 Introduction to Paralegal Studies

This course introduces the student to the evolving role of the paralegal or legal assistant in the public and private sectors. Topics of study include paralegal employment opportunities, regulation, and ethics. The course also introduces students to the steps and tasks involved in civil litigation. Students will practice the role of the litigation paralegal using a hypothetical case. This includes investigation and gathering facts, discovery, trial support, and judgment enforcement. Procedures and rules that facilitate the fair resolution of conflicts and the substantive law that forms the basis of the rights and remedies protected by the civil litigation system will be studied.

  1. Analyze what paralegals do, the career choices available to paralegals, their role in the legal profession, and the need for continuing education and training.
  2. Examine the ethics and professional responsibility of a paralegal, licensing requirements, and the unauthorized practice of law.
  3. Examine the paralegal workplace, tasks, and functions of a paralegal and accounting procedures in the law office.
  4. Interpret the main provisions of the U.S. Constitution and classify other sources of law in the United States.
  5. Compare and contrast the federal and state court systems, the litigation process (civil and criminal), the appellate process, and other nonjudicial alternative dispute resolution procedures.
  6. Distinguish the major elements that comprise the substantive areas of torts and contract law.
  7. Distinguish the major elements that comprise the substantive areas of property law and employment law.
  8. Distinguish the major elements that comprise the substantive areas of family law and intellectual property.
  9. Conduct effective interviews of clients and witnesses, think and write critically, and conduct legal research using electronic libraries and other online resources.
  10. Use technology and information resources to research issues in paralegal studies.
  11. Write clearly and concisely about paralegal studies using proper writing mechanics.
Course Guide
LEG 110 Civil and Criminal Procedures

Analyzes the process by which substantive rights and duties are enforced, including legal pleadings, discovery procedures, pre- and post-trial motions, jurisdiction, venue, trial by jury, equity, and previous adjudication problems.

  1. Describe the origins and objectives of law, and how law interacts with equity and morality.
  2. Define the application of jurisdiction, the structure of federal and state court systems, and whether the federal court in a given situation has jurisdiction over a particular case.
  3. Explain the differences and commonalities between civil and criminal law and procedures.
  4. Provide examples of the limitations in seeking relief and be able to discuss judicial remedies.
  5. Describe contractual agreements, and the implication for property disputes and Family Law.
  6. Define the Law of Torts and the relationship to Tort Law in cases of negligence.
  7. Provide examples of the organization and classification of administrative agencies, and the laws to which agencies must adhere.
  8. Describe the alternative procedures outside the litigation process for settling disputes.
  9. Use technology and information resources to research issues related to civil and criminal procedures.
  10. Write clearly and concisely about issues in law and the legal system using proper writing mechanics.
Course Guide
LEG 200 White Collar Crime in Government, Business, and Labor

Examines criminal fraud, deceit, and misconduct by individuals, government, and business organizations. Reviews the various categories of white-collar crime including the general nature of the crimes, typical participants, application of technology in crimes, and factors contributing to the crimes. Discusses corporate and the legal system's effectiveness in combating these problems.

  1. Differentiate between white-collar crime and other types of illegal acts.
  2. Describe the various categories of white-collar crime, including the general nature of the crimes, typical participants, application of technology in crimes, and factors contributing to the crimes.
  3. Analyze white-collar crime in terms of various theories related to criminology and crime.
  4. Relate the sources of laws to white-collar crime and apply the basic provisions of major laws addressing white-collar crime.
  5. Discuss the principle processes and government agencies involved in regulating/policing white- collar crime and the various self-regulation approaches used by organizations.
  6. Determine the nature of fraud, its impact on business organizations, and recent trends in fraud prevention.
  7. Evaluate the considerations and various controls and antifraud measures that organizations can use in developing fraud prevention programs.
  8. Use technology and information resources to research issues in white-collar crime.
  9. Write clearly and concisely about white-collar crime using proper writing mechanics.
Course Guide
LEG 210 Legal, Social, and Ethical Issues in E-Commerce

Examines a variety of issues associated with conducting electronic commerce. Reviews the legal environment of business and the basis for business ethics. Examines key provisions of law relative to the protection of intellectual property, Web-based commercial activity, e-Contracts, and consumer protection. Discusses the nature of a variety of cybercrimes.

  1. Describe the legal environment of business, the sources of American law, and the basis of authority for government to regulate business.
  2. Define business ethics, explain the role of ethics in business, and describe the sources of ethical standards.
  3. Determine how tort law and cybertort law impacts business operations.
  4. Analyze the key provisions of law relative to intellectual property, the Internet, and cybercrime.
  5. Summarize the underlying principles affecting international transactions and explain the jurisdiction of key U.S. commercial laws.
  6. Describe the requirements of a contract and explain the basic provisions of contract law relative to e-Contracts, contract formation, enforceability, discharge, and remedies.
  7. Examine how product liability and strict liability impacts business operations.
  8. Analyze the principal types of business organizations and their key features.
  9. Examine how the key powers and functions of administrative agencies relate to the conduct of business.
  10. Explain the key provisions of federal law related to consumer protection, online securities offering, investor protection, and corporate governance.
  11. Use technology and information resources to research legal, social, and ethical issues in e-Commerce.
  12. Write clearly and concisely about legal, social, and ethical issues in e-Commerce using proper writing mechanics.
Course Guide
LEG 320 Criminal Law

This course familiarizes the student with the origins of criminal law and explores its historical development into modern American crimes codes. Each lesson introduces the student to substantive criminal law and associated legal principles and terminology. This course contrasts elements of crimes against persons, crimes against property, cyber-crime, white collar crime, and other types of crime. Early and modern approaches to identifying, deterring, preventing, detecting, prosecuting, and punishing criminal behavior are also examined.

  1. Describe the nature and history of American criminal law.
  2. Explain the role of individuals and federal, state, and local government agencies in crime fighting and prosecution of criminal offenses.
  3. Analyze the essential legal elements of criminal conduct.
  4. Explain the concept of criminal liability.
  5. Apply the concept of criminal responsibility and give examples of justifications, excuses, and incapacity for criminal acts.
  6. Contrast crimes against persons, crimes against property, and other types of criminal conduct.
  7. Contrast white-collar crime, commercial crime, and cyber crime from conventional criminal conduct.
  8. Use technology and information resources to research issues in criminal law.
  9. Write clearly and concisely about criminal law using proper writing mechanics.
Course Guide
LEG 400 Family Law

This course reviews substantive and procedural law relative to divorce, adoption, guardianship, custody, and other family law matters within the jurisdiction of the Probate Court. It covers the legal status of children, legal rights of women, illegitimacy and paternity proceedings, as well as divorce procedures and child custody and support issues. The course will simulate factual situations using legal concepts to enhance analytic skills.

  1. Explain the evolution of the laws regulating marriage and premarital agreements.
  2. Explain the legal rights of women surrounding domestic violence.
  3. Explain the various actions involved in the divorce process (complaint, discovery, relief, resolution, hearing, trial, appeal)
  4. Explain the legal framework of child custody proceedings (parent and non-parent custodial arrangements, visitation rights, etc.)
  5. Explain the administrative framework for child and spousal support, including guidelines, enforcement, duration, and tax implications.
  6. Describe the approaches to marital property division, including classification, valuation, distribution, and tax implications.
  7. Explain the legal framework for paternity issues.
  8. Explain the legal framework for adoption.
  9. Use technology and information resources to research issues in family law.
  10. Write clearly and concisely about family law using correct grammar and mechanics.
Course Guide
LEG 420 U.S. Courts

This course examines the American judicial system to include federal, state, and local courts. The professional courtroom work group, non-professional courtroom participants, the trial process, and challenges to the trial process are described. The activities of lawyers, judges, and related occupations and professions are reviewed. An overview of the juvenile court system is included.

  1. Analyze the functions of law and identify various types of law.
  2. Describe the structure of American courts, including federal and state courts, explain court jurisdiction.
  3. Illustrate the workings of the adversary system.
  4. Analyze the role of prosecutors and illustrate prosecutorial misconduct.
  5. Analyze the role of the defense attorney, and illustrate the importance of legal ethics and professional responsibility as they impact that role.
  6. Analyze the role of the judge, and review judicial qualifications, training, and misconduct.
  7. Determine the functions of juries, to include grand juries, petit juries, jury selection, and jury verdicts.
  8. Analyze pretrial procedures, including initial appearance, bail decision making, alternative dispute resolution, and plea bargaining.
  9. Trace the steps in the trial process, and explain trial procedures – including speedy trial, bench trial, and jury trials.
  10. Analyze the sentencing process and examine the role of the appellate court.
  11. Appraise today’s juvenile justice process, including the jurisdiction of juvenile courts, the rights of juveniles facing court processing, the nature of delinquency, status offenses, and blended sentences.
  12. Use technology and information resources to research issues in U.S. Courts.
  13. Write clearly and concisely about U.S. Courts topics using proper writing mechanics.
Course Guide

Mathematics

MAT 104 Algebra with Applications
MAT 200 Precalculus
MAT 300 Statistics
MAT 310 Calculus I
MAT 311 Discrete Math

This course provides an introduction to discrete mathematics. The course introduces formal logic and its applications. It also develops relational thinking through the study of sets, relations, functions, and graphs. The concept of recursion and its applications is also covered. It also develops quantitative thinking through the study of permutations, combinations, and counting operations in algorithms. Finally, this course shows how these concepts can be applied towards analyzing the accuracy and efficiency of algorithms.

Course Guide

MKT 100 Principles of Marketing

Introduces basic marketing principles and concepts. Emphasis is placed on the development of marketing strategy and the major components of the marketing mix, (product, price, promotion, and distribution). Reviews the critical environmental factors of markets, domestic and international, and customer behavior characteristics that affect marketing operations. Highlights the integration of marketing with other functions in a business organization. 


MKT 305 Consumer Behavior

Presents the process for performing consumer analyses to develop effective marketing strategy. Examines the principles of individual, group, and social dynamics influencing consumer behavior. Reviews the consumer decision-making process and marketing approaches that can be used to improve consumer sales performance and customer satisfaction.

  1. Analyze consumer behavior as a field of study and its role in business and society.
  2. Explain how consumers determine value and the value framework they assign to goods and services.
  3. Analyze the internal influences that affect consumer behavior.
  4. Analyze the external influences that affect consumer behavior.
  5. Evaluate various consumer situations.
  6. Assess the consumer decision-making process.
  7. Examine the consumer behavior process of consumption, value and satisfaction, and relationships.
  8. Determine the ethical implications of consumer and marketing misbehavior.
  9. Use technology and information resources to research issues in consumer behavior.
  10. Write clearly and concisely about consumer behavior using proper writing mechanics.
Course Guide
MKT 310 Retail Management

Examines the strategic management of retail operations using various forms of store-based, online, and nonstore-based retailing. Reviews critical principles such as strategic planning considerations, the structure of retail firms, consumer behavior, market research, and location considerations. Examines the key functional areas of managing retail operations including merchandising, finance, human resource management, operations management, logistics, retail image and atmosphere, and the marketing functions of pricing and promotion.

  1. Describe the special characteristics of retailing and the importance of building and sustaining relationships.
  2. Explain the process of strategic planning in retailing and the characteristics of ownership.
  3. Describe the evolution of retail institutions and forms of nontraditional retailing.
  4. Examine the characteristics of retail institutions based on ownership type.
  5. Examine nonstore retailing, electronic retailing, and nontraditional retailing approaches.
  6. Analyze the retailing consumer and database management in retailing.
  7. Analyze consumer characteristics in relation to retail marketing strategy.
  8. Analyze human resource management and financial aspects of operation management in retail organizations.
  9. Describe the dimensions of operating a retail business and the development of merchandise plans.
  10. Examine the implementation and financial management of merchandise plans.
  11. Explain the factors affecting the retailing pricing strategy and the significance of a retail image.
  12. Evaluate the elements of the retail promotional strategy and the importance of the retail audit for integration and control.
  13. Use technology and information resources to research issues in retail management.
  14. Write clearly and concisely about retail management using proper writing mechanics.
Course Guide
MKT 312 Marketing Communications

This course explores the essential elements of marketing communication. Topics covered include media and messages, word-of-mouth, internet marketing and the ever-changing communication market. Selecting appropriate communication channels to highlight products, brands, and services to sustain a competitive advantage will be highlighted.

  1. Explain the role communication plays in marketing programs.
  2. Explain the role of corporate image and product branding in marketing programs.
  3. Explain common buyer behaviors and how they influence marketing programs.
  4. Explain how promotion opportunities are analyzed.
  5. Analyze the advertising tools available to determine which ones to use for a specific situation.
  6. Analyze media tools that can be used to enhance the marketing communication.
  7. Describe the promotional tools available for use in marketing.
  8. Describe the ethics and regulations that influence marketing communications.
  9. Analyze the evaluation of an integrated marketing program.
  10. Use technology and information resources to research issues in marketing communication.
Course Guide
MKT 315 Business Logistics Management

Examines the components and configuration of supply chains in support of marketing and retailing operations. Reviews the considerations for aligning the supply chain configuration to the overall marketing strategy. Analyzes considerations for material sourcing, inventory management, distribution channel configuration, forecasting and supply network coordination, channel performance monitoring, technology applications, and supply chain design options.

  1. Explain the role of marketing channels in the overall marketing strategy of an organization.
  2. Outline and describe the basic configurations, flows of products and information, and typical participants in marketing channels.
  3. Analyze the major environmental variables in markets and explain how these affect marketing channel operations.
  4. Examine the importance of defining roles and communication in regards to conflict and power in the marketing channel.
  5. Analyze markets and formulate effective marketing channel strategy and designs to support the channel activities.
  6. Analyze the channel member selection process, market geography, size, density, and behavior in relation to designing a strategic marketing channel.
  7. Propose ways to motivate channel members.
  8. Determine the key considerations in synchronizing product planning and marketing channel management throughout the product life cycle.
  9. Assess the configuration of the marketing channel pricing structures and the guidelines for effective channel pricing strategies.
  10. Differentiate between the different push promotion strategies in marketing channels.
  11. Explain the role of logistics in marketing channels and describe the components of logistics systems.
  12. Determine the key considerations for evaluating marketing channel performance.
  13. Examine the structure, developments and trends, and advantages of electronic marketing channels.
  14. Explain the rationale for franchise marketing channels.
  15. Examine the unique characteristics of services and explain the impact of these characteristics on managing marketing channels.
  16. Analyze the environment, design, and behavioral processes in international channels and propose ways to motivate international channel members.
  17. Use technology and information resources to research issues in business logistics management.
  18. Write clearly and concisely about business logistics management using proper writing mechanics.
Course Guide
MKT 320 International Marketing

Provides an overview of the concepts and practices of marketing worldwide and the modifications and adaptations required to meet the different problems and challenges involved.

  1. Determine the role of government in international trade, the various levels of economic integration, and the impact on international marketing.
  2. Examine the economic and cultural elements of the international marketing environment and explain how these factors affect marketing operations.
  3. Summarize the major political and financial risks associated with international marketing.
  4. Analyze the strategic marketing planning process, strategies for entering foreign markets, and considerations for subsequent market expansion.
  5. Examine the process for market research to assess foreign market potential.
  6. Evaluate the considerations for product adaptation in foreign markets and common approaches to adjusting promotional strategy to fit foreign markets.
  7. Formulate the core marketing concepts into viable marketing strategies to support exporting and the full range of global marketing operations.
  8. Assess the key factors in price determination, alternative pricing strategies used in international marketing, and the common terms of sale and payment used in international marketing.
  9. Determine the logistics and product distribution channel options available to support international marketing.
  10. Use technology and information resources to research issues in international marketing.
  11. Write clearly and concisely about international marketing using proper writing mechanics.
Course Guide
MKT 402 Strategic Market Pricing

Analyzes the critical factors in making pricing decisions and presents a process for cost and pricing analysis. Reviews the concept of value creation and examines a variety of pricing policies and techniques that can be incorporated into a marketing strategy to achieve stated objectives. Examines pricing strategy over the life cycle of products.

  1. Analyze the key elements of strategic pricing and the role of pricing decisions in marketing strategy.
  2. Evaluate the impact assessing value has on pricing strategy and profitability, and the importance of market segmentation.
  3. Analyze the application of various pricing strategies and tactics to develop and manage an overall pricing strategy for a company.
  4. Evaluate the effectiveness of price and value communication strategies.
  5. Assess and create pricing policies for various purposes including price objections, price increases, economic downturn, and promotional pricing strategies.
  6. Analyze the price-setting process used to establish sustainable and profitable prices.
  7. Evaluate key pricing considerations and strategies relative to the product life cycle.
  8. Examine the challenges of effectively implementing pricing strategy into an organization.
  9. Differentiate between incremental and avoidable costs and analyze contribution margins.
  10. Use break-even analysis and outline approaches to determining marketing profitability.
  11. Assess the strategies used by competitors and create solutions to react to their actions.
  12. Determine the best method of managing competitive information.
  13. Assess the importance of accurate measurement of price sensitivity of consumers.
  14. Analyze ethical and legal issues related to pricing.
  15. Use technology and information resources to research issues in strategic market pricing.
  16. Write clearly and concisely about strategic market pricing using proper writing mechanics.
Course Guide
MKT 475 Strategic Marketing

This course focuses on the strategic elements of marketing that organizations need to effectively compete in today’s business environment. Tools will be presented for use with gathering and analyzing marketing data, decision making, and implementation. The advances in technology will also be explored as well as the related impact on the marketing environment, competitiveness, and customer information.

  1. Explain the concept of strategic marketing.
  2. Analyze markets, segments, and customer value to determine the best marketing strategy.
  3. Analyze market-driven strategies as they relate to specific situations.
  4. Analyze the parts of a market-driven program development.
  5. Identify the factors and issues that influence global market-driven organizations.
  6. Explain the implementation and management of market-driven strategies.
  7. Evaluate the importance of value chain strategies to the marketing channel.
  8. Analyze pricing objectives, price sensitivity, strategies, policy, and structure to determine the best pricing strategy.
  9. Analyze the selling functions used by organizations to increase buyer response from marketing strategies.
  10. Use technology and information resources to research issues in strategic marketing.
  11. Write clearly and concisely about strategic marketing using proper writing mechanics.
Course Guide

Political Science

POL 110 U.S. Government
POL 300 Contemporary International Problems

Analyzes the origins and recent developments of major international problems in the Middle East, Central America, Asia and Africa, and their multi-dimensional impact on world events.

Course Guide

Security

SEC 310 Homeland Security Organization and Administration

This course covers the structure of a homeland security organization at the local, regional, and national levels. This course provides an explanation of the homeland security administration functions that must be performed at the different levels.

  1. Describe the foundations of homeland security.
  2. Compare and contrast homeland security agencies at the federal, state, and local levels.
  3. Explain the national infrastructure plan in the context of strategic targets.
  4. Describe counterterrorism and anti-terrorism laws in the United States.
  5. Compare and contrast terrorism, terrorist groups, organized crime, and their financing activities and practices.
  6. Analyze the role of intelligence and counterterrorism activities among federal agencies.
  7. Describe the types and uses of weapons of mass destruction.
  8. List and describe the various types of and practice of cybercrime.
  9. Explain the role of policing in homeland security.
  10. Summarize border security and immigration issues.
  11. Describe the practice and policies at the local, federal, and state level in homeland security response.
  12. Describe future trends in homeland security and terrorist activities.
  13. Evaluate the ethical concerns that homeland security practices raise in society and the impact of information technologies on crime, terrorism, or war.
  14. Investigate the mission, goals, and strategy of the National Security Agency / Central Security Services (NSA / CSS) in regards to the protection of national security interests.
  15. Use technology and information resources to research issues in homeland security.
  16. Write clearly and concisely about topics related to Homeland Security Organization and Administration using proper writing mechanics and technical style conventions.
Course Guide
SEC 402 Cyber Security

This course explores the practices and framework designed to ensure cyberspace security. Students will explore the areas of common practice in the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Essential Body of Knowledge. Topics include the various roles, functions, and competencies within the cybersecurity domain to mitigate risks and secure organizational assets.

  1. Describe and apply the 14 areas of common practice in the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Essential Body of Knowledge.
  2. Describe best practices in cybersecurity.
  3. Identify and analyze the role of the Chief Information Officer, Information Security Officer, and IT Security Compliance Officer in the context of cybersecurity.
  4. Compare and contrast the functional roles of an organization in the context of cybersecurity.
  5. Describe the corollary roles of security in an enterprise.
  6. Explain data security competencies to include turning policy into practice.
  7. Describe digital forensics and process management.
  8. Create an enterprise continuity plan.
  9. Describe and create an incident management and response plan.
  10. Describe system, application, network, and telecommunications security policies and response.
  11. Describe physical security plans and processes.
  12. Explain legal and regulatory compliance practices.
  13. Explain risk management plans and policies.
  14. Identify the strategic management issues in cybersecurity planning and response.
  15. Develop a cybersecurity plan that incorporates the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Essential Body of Knowledge.
  16. Evaluate the ethical concerns inherent in cybersecurity and how these concerns affect organizational policies.
  17. Use technology and information resources to research issues in cybersecurity.
  18. Write clearly and concisely about topics associated with cybersecurity using proper writing mechanics and technical style conventions.
Course Guide

Sociology

SOC 100 Introduction to Sociology
SOC 205 Society, Law and Government

This course examines the function of the American court system in its operational role within the government, the rule of law, and society. The criminal court process and the role of the judiciary are explained from a policy making perspective that reveals the impact of the courts on society and the rule of law in the evolution of social change.

Course Guide
SOC 300 Sociology of Developing Countries
SOC 303 Middle Eastern Studies

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